anti-humanism


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anti-humanism

(post-structuralism) the displacement of the human subject from centre stage, e.g. as the seat of reason, history or truth. See also HUMANISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
From their own self-otherness, Derrida constitutes a space between Sartre's humanism and Levi-Strauss' anti-humanism which is marked by self-difference.
His anti-progressivism, skepticism, and anti-humanism each find expression in the three parts of his latest book.
The surprising confluence of Christianity and anti-humanism in Highsmith's work is strongest in her representation of evil.
Apart from the perhaps understandable fact that a book of such sweep cannot be strong in all its parts, the two greatest reservations about Kittler's method derive indeed from his anti-Humanism.
Morel's name in Paul Morel] into the less sympathetic Gertrude is a symptom of Lawrence's increasing misogyny, which no doubt contributed to his anti-humanism, as well as to his obsession with debunking Freudian ideas about incest.
The (Renaissance) Humanisms that Grassi, Castelli, and Garin continued to study, promote, and develop for our age, lived out and defended the Italian philosophical "difference" in the second half of the twentieth century as Popefree countries went on to plan the advent of a so-called Post-modernity with the aid of Heidegger's alleged anti-Humanism and his call for a wholesale overcoming of Western thought.
The authors analyze the cultural and intellectual experiences and faculties of the enlightened women of Venice by contrasting those women and their learning to Katherine's anti-humanism in The Taming of the Shrew.
After all (on the one hand), skeptics will wonder who can speak for ethics in the face of postmodern pluralism and anti-humanism.
That is, if we stick with the modern humanist subject of moral action, and follow seriously the extension of ethical obligations to non-human beings, then we would suggest that what we find is that the utopian demand of modern humanism turns over into a utopian anti-humanism, with suicide as its outcome.
Between those two poles, the book appears as an ambivalent exploration of the dilemmas of anti-humanism.
From this viewpoint Sloterdijk's lesson is quite clear: anti-humanism is the metaphysics of misanthropy.
He rejects "ideological anti-humanism," which he identifies as a negative practice that nullifies a priori the sovereignty of the Enlightenment subject, instead of dismantling the assumptions this subject mobilizes in the ever-changing landscape of the post-Enlightenment world, precisely in order to wrest subjectivity away from its presumably impermeable ideological trappings.