dystopia

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Related to anti-utopia: Cacotopia, Dystopic

dystopia

the reverse of UTOPIA, a possible or imaginary social place which is the worst of possible worlds.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

Dystopia

Eagerness (See ZEAL.)
Brave New World
Aldous Huxley’s grim picture of the future, where scientific and social developments have turned life into a tragic travesty. [Br. Lit.: Magill I, 79]
Erewhon
inhabitants worship superficiality, unreason, inconsistency, and evasion: a lampoon of 19th-century society. [Br. Lit.: Erewhon in Haydn & Fuller, 239]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet there is a hero in this anti-utopia, and Orwell's magnificent portrait exemplifies its consummate artistry.
El ultimo es el que utiliza la narracion para trazar mejor los contornos de la anti-utopia. Se trata de la historia de Martin Castro.
|The Black Anti-Utopia." Black American Literature Forum 12 (1978):107-09.
In this new book, Bill Ashcroft sets out to answer Krishan Kumar's rather outlandish claim (in Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times [1987]) that there is no utopian tradition beyond the Western and Christian cultures.
With her understanding of the genre established, Layh then describes three distinct developments after 1900 in reaction to the perceived shortcomings of the classical model: the advent of the critical utopia, the feminist utopia, and the anti-utopia. The critical utopia, a term coined by Tom Moylan in his influential Demand the Impossible (1986), is a reaction to the shortcomings of the classic model.
This recurs when Blaim turns to dystopia and anti-utopia; here too, an assumed understanding consigns further clarification to the endnotes.
As scholars have shown, the utopian novels and stories of the last quarter of the nineteenth century differ from earlier utopias like Thomas More's Utopia (1516) in that they see the ideal society in temporal rather than spatial terms, i.e., as developing in the future rather than already existing on, say, a remote island (Manuel, "Toward a Psychological History" 79-80; Walsh 71; Kumar, Utopia and Anti-Utopia 45).
The haphazard choice of essays and the absence of a guiding view of the progress of utopia (or of the rise of anti-utopia and dystopia) in the twentieth century reduce this section to an almost random collection of essays.
Fietz's presentation of "utopian thought" underscores the need for readers of this journal to re-appropriate and clarify the concepts of "utopia"/"utopianism," "anti-utopia"/"dystopia," pairs which Fietz uses interchangeably.