antiarrhythmic


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antiarrhythmic

[‚an·tē‚ā′rith·mik]
(medicine)
An agent that prevents or alleviates cardiac arrhythmia.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the maintenance of sinus rhythm after cardioversion, analysis of 29 trials involving 10 antiarrhythmic agents showed that quinidine, disopyramide, flecainide, propafenone, and sotalol had the strongest evidence of efficacy.
Although this prespecified secondary study end point has important clinical implications, the primary end points in this pilot study had to do with the investigational antiarrhythmic agent's effects on ICD function.
Rythmol(R) SR (propafenone hydrochloride) extended release is an effective treatment to help maintain sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation who require antiarrhythmic therapy and who are without structural heart disease.
Amiodarone is the most effective antiarrhythmic agent available today.
Patients who received electrophysiologically guided antiarrhythmic drug therapy actually had slightly worse survival than control subjects given neither ICD nor drugs (N.
Marketing approval was recently granted for dofetilide, a "pure" class III antiarrhythmic agent and is anticipated this year for azimilide, a similar agent.
Twelve months after entry into the study, patients who underwent ablation had their AF burden decreased by an average of 20 percentage points, compared with baseline, while the AF burden dropped by an average of 12 percentage points among patients maintained on antiarrhythmic drugs, a difference that was not statistically significant.
The main purpose of the CAPTAF trial2 was to compare the treatment effects of AF ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs using quality of life as the primary endpoint and an implantable cardiac monitor to assess AF burden.
Brinavess is an antiarrhythmic drug that acts preferentially in the atria by prolonging atrial refractoriness and slowing impulse conduction in a rate-dependent fashion.
In a meta-analysis of prospective studies published through 2007, the single-procedure success rate for radiofrequency ablation in achieving sinus rhythm without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs was 57%, climbing to 71% with multiple ablation procedures.