antibonding orbital

antibonding orbital

[′an·tē′bänd·iŋ ′ȯr·bə·təl]
(physics)
An atomic or molecular orbital whose energy increases as atoms are brought closer together, indicating a net repulsion rather than a net attraction and chemical bonding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Light absorption results in elevating the electron from a bonding orbital to an antibonding orbital in the molecule.
Far from the surface and in the absence of a field, the atomic orbitals of A and B hybridize into molecular orbitals which we take to be a low-lying bonding orbital and an empty antibonding orbital. As the molecule approaches the surface, additional hybidization with the substrate atoms occurs leading to shifts and broadening of these orbitals, e.g.
The electronic transition from the metal and QN/Cl ligands to the antibonding orbitals of the {Ru(II)-N[O.sup.+]} group upon photoirradiation weakens the bonding of Ru-NO and leads to dissociation of NO [51-53].
All antibonding orbitals are empty except [2t.sub.2g] ([[pi].sup.*]) on the bottom of conduction band, which are partially filled in the case of [Ti.sub.2][O.sub.3] and [Ti.sub.3][O.sub.5] (having 1 electron) and TiO (having 2 electrons).
The bands exhibit different intensities and are assigned to the n [right arrow] [[sigma].sup.*] transition from nonbonding to sigma antibonding orbitals. This transition usually comes from saturated compound containing atoms with nonbonding orbital, that is, a lone pair on oxygen, such as C-O bond in the polymer chain, whereas, the plasticized and filler added SPE were observed at around 218-237 nm.
Furthermore, the interaction between the pz orbitals of adjacent atoms is small, which results in bonding and antibonding orbitals close to the Fermi level.