anticenter

anticenter

[¦an·tē′sent·ər]
(astronomy)
The direction in the sky opposite to that of the center of the Galaxy, located in the constellation Auriga.
(geology)
The point on the surface of the earth that is diametrically opposite the epicenter of an earthquake. Also known as antiepicenter.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From Sagittarius, the hazy band of white light appears to pass westward to the Galactic anticenter in Auriga.
The galaxy's center (galactic longitude and latitude 0[degrees]) is in extreme western Sagittarius, and the anticenter (longitude 180[degrees], latitude 0[degrees]) is located on the Taurus-Gemini border 3 1/2[degrees] east of Beta ([beta]) Tauri, the star also known as Elnath.
At the sidereal time shown on our all-sky map, the galactic anticenter is near the zenith for mid-northern observers.
We propose here to study the Galactic diffuse emissions in the Galactic plane, particularly focusing on the anticenter region.
This corresponds to 1391 pixels at [N.sub.side] = 64 in the anticenter region.
Longitude 180[degrees], the galactic anticenter, is near Beta ([beta]) Tauri on the Taurus-Auriga border.
The center itself is just above the southwest horizon, and the galactic anticenter is just below the northeast horizon.
On the other hand, the short-period objects dominate the distribution in the direction of the anticenter, with the most frequent period being only four days.
The numerous small ones appear to be fairly uniformly spread over the sky, except for one remarkable grouping near the galactic anticenter. Large, intense sources, on the other hand, show a marked concentration toward the central plane of the galaxy....
The "anticenter," 180[degrees] away, lies in Auriga near the Taurus border east of Beta ([beta]) Tauri, low in the northwest sky.
If you want attention, you name an institution the "Center for Whatever." Nobody would endow an "Anticenter for Astrophysics."
Here we are looking at right angles to both the galactic center and anticenter into the depths of the Milky Way's disk along our spiral arm.