anticipation


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anticipation

Music an unstressed, usually short note introduced before a downbeat and harmonically related to the chord immediately following it

Anticipation

 

in psychology and philosophy, the ability to react to events ahead of time. This concept of “anticipation” is closest to the concept introduced in psychology by the German scientist W. Wundt. Psychologists distinguish two senses in which the term “anticipation” is used: (1) an organism’s expectation of a certain situation, which is manifested in some pose or movement; and (2) manifestation by a human being of the results of his action even before the action is performed (hence the definition of the goal as the anticipated subject).

In philosophy, the concept of anticipation is encountered as far back as the Stoics and Epicureans in reference to prolepsis—the general concept of knowledge before the perception of concrete individual things directly from the Logos. F. Bacon took a firm position against anticipation, proceeding from the principle that nature has to be studied, not anticipated. Kant used the term to mean “a priori knowledge of subjects of perception before the perceptions themselves.”

In logic, anticipation is used to denote temporary acceptance of a proposition which is to be proved subsequently, as if it were already proven.

V. A. KOSTELOVSKII

anticipation

[an‚tis·ə′pā·shən]
(genetics)
The occurrence of a phenotype at a younger age or in a more severe form in succeeding generations of a family.
References in classic literature ?
The thought took a deal of the spirit out of his anticipations.
And now, when they were all in lively anticipation of "the two villains" being taken, and when the bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives, the fire to flare for them, the smoke to hurry away in pursuit of them, Joe to hammer and clink for them, and all the murky shadows on the wall to shake at them in menace as the blaze rose and sank and the red-hot sparks dropped and died, the pale after-noon outside, almost seemed in my pitying young fancy to have turned pale on their account, poor wretches.
he hastened to add, silently, in anticipation of his own conscience.
This anticipation proved but too true, as my learned correspondent
He did so, and pensively apostrophized it with a shocking epithet in anticipation of the time when its appetite must be satisfied from the provision shop instead of from its mother's breast.
And so well founded did his apprehension prove, and so correct was his anticipation, that scarcely had his master got into bed when he said, "What dost thou think of tonight's adventure, Sancho?
And because I observed, besides, that an inquiry of this kind was of all others of the greatest moment, and one in which precipitancy and anticipation in judgment were most to be dreaded, I thought that I ought not to approach it till I had reached a more mature age (being at that time but twenty-three), and had first of all employed much of my time in preparation for the work, as well by eradicating from my mind all the erroneous opinions I had up to that moment accepted, as by amassing variety of experience to afford materials for my reasonings, and by continually exercising myself in my chosen method with a view to increased skill in its application.
The enthusiastic Chaerephon (probably in anticipation of the answer which he received) had gone to Delphi and asked the oracle if there was any man wiser than Socrates; and the answer was, that there was no man wiser.
The claims of justice, both on one side and on the other, will be in force, and must be fulfilled; the rights of humanity must in all cases be duly and mutually respected; whilst considerations of a common interest, and, above all, the remembrance of the endearing scenes which are past, and the anticipation of a speedy triumph over the obstacles to reunion, will, it is hoped, not urge in vain MODERATION on one side, and PRUDENCE on the other.
Love" then becomes "the anticipation of benefits"; "duty" becomes "necessity" or "fitness"; and other words are correspondingly transmuted.
A little shiver of anticipation tingled his spine, and then, quite without volition, he found himself gazing into the loving eyes of his mother and the strong face of the father which mirrored, beneath its masculine strength, a love no less than the mother's eyes proclaimed.
He could have wished it otherwise; never in his life had he been conscious of so sharp a wish to see and touch his fellow-creatures; for struggle as he might, there was borne in upon his mind a crushing anticipation of calamity.