anticoagulant


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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the last few years, due to the introduction of new types of anticoagulants with other modes of action (NOAKs), the relative importance of warfarin has decreased.
The global Anticoagulant Drugs market has been thoroughly analyzed in the report for an inclusive understanding.
The combination of the ICH reversal protocol and staff education resulted in a standardized process for an effective rapid anticoagulant reversal in eligible patients with oral anticoagulant-associated ICH.
Those studies showed that over 70 percent of Northern spotted owls and 40 percent of barred owls are contaminated with rodenticides; that ferruginous hawks preferentially prey on poisoned rodents; and that exposure to first generation anticoagulants is linked to diseases that impact the immune systems of animals like coyotes and mountain lions.
Study limitations included potential misclassification of anticoagulant treatment, PPI cotherapy, and NSAIDs; confounding by unmeasured factors; and gastrointestinal bleeding being measured using a disease risk score.
With current anticoagulants, however, such combination treatment is generally limited to 12 months because of an increased risk of major bleeding.
2 are used to restore physiological hemostasis in patients utilizing an anticoagulant including (1) enhancing the rate of drug clearance (elimination) (2) hemostatic agents (reversal agents) that activate coagulation by alternative pathways (3) replacement of the coagulation factors that are inhibited by the anticoagulant (4) Drug-specific antidotes that neutralize the anticoagulation of the drug [15].
Patients with a high risk of stroke and low risk of bleeding are placed on anticoagulant therapy.
Laboratory measurement of the anticoagulant activity of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants.
In patients without CKD, the risk of bleeding and benefits of preventing ischemic stroke between direct oral anticoagulant and warfarin use were similar.
During the same time frame, the portion of patients with atrial fibrillation who were prescribed anticoagulants increased from 35.4% to 75.5% among those with high stroke risk.

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