anticoagulant

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Related to anticoagulant rodenticide: diphacinone, warfarin poisoning

anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
On day 2, the results of the deceased mate's blood anticoagulant rodenticide screen confirmed the presence of brodifacoum at 0.
Exposure of non-target wildlife to anticoagulant rodenticides in California.
While anticoagulant rodenticides have been used for decades, the more powerful second-generation anticoagulants were introduced in the late 1970s after there was concern about mice and rats becoming resistant to the first-generation products.
Chocolate brown blood may indicate methemoglobinemia; watery not coagulable blood and bleeding from the venepuncture site suggest anticoagulant rodenticides (Patterino et al.
Anticoagulants and vitamin K: The simple explanation, and all you really need to know, is anticoagulant rodenticides deplete vitamin K levels and then the blood cannot clot properly.
Notable findings included a resurgence of West Nile virus (WNV) in birds, late winter outbreaks of salmonellosis in redpolls at bird feeders, eagles killing other eagles, several cases of rabies in deer, and multiple poisonings of red-tailed hawks with anticoagulant rodenticides in New York City.
paracetamol and household pesticides such as anticoagulant rodenticides, pyrethroids, some cholinesterase inhibitors and irritant/corrosive cleaning agents, are readily accessible on supermarket shelves in SA.
Anticoagulant rodenticides, commonly known by trade names such as D-Con, kill rodents by causing their blood to stop clotting so that they bleed out three or four days after eating the poison.
In 1995, most persons who reported exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides did not develop symptoms or require specific therapy.
Subsequently, farmers respond using anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) to control voles.
The use of anticoagulant rodenticides, for the control of porcupine requires higher operational cost (Khan and Mian, 2008), while the fumigation of porcupine burrows is only feasible in the loamy soils (Mushtaq et al.

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