anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient agreed for and was started on therapeutic anticoagulation initially with low molecular weight heparin for two days and then switched to warfarin.
Vitamin K supplementation can improve stability of anticoagulation for patients with unexplained variability in response to warfarin.
Among the minority of AF patients who were receiving therapeutic anticoagulation at the time of their stroke, 7,176 were taking adequate warfarin and 8,290 were taking adequate NOACs such as dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis).
After the fourth hour, TAT levels were increased in the group without systemic anticoagulation (p<0.
The Oral Anticoagulation Reversal Knowledge Centre is available to access in full and at no cost to registered users of epgonline.
6-10) Perioperative anticoagulation is used in selected cases.
Low-molecular-weight heparin as bridging anticoagulation during interruption of warfarin: assessment of a standardized periprocedural anticoagulation regimen.
In patients with a stroke and a cardiomyopathy with ejection fraction <35%, without apparent thrombus, it is unclear whether anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy has better outcomes, and the choice of approach can be individualized.
Therapeutic indications are those that have documented venous thromboembolism (VTE) and at least one of the following: absolute or relative contraindications to anticoagulation, complications from prior anticoagulation, failure of anticoagulation, recurrent PE despite anticoagulation, progression of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) while on anticoagulation, massive PE with residual DVT in a patient at risk for additional PE, free-floating iliofemoral or IVC thrombus, and DVT with severe cardiopulmonary disease.
Intravenous bivalirudin (bolus and infusion) was used as anticoagulation during the procedure.
The study published online today in the American Journal of Medicine provides the most up-to-date picture of European cardiologists' prescribing of antithrombotic treatment, which includes oral anticoagulation therapy (warfarin and the novel oral anticoagulants) and antiplatelet drugs (mainly aspirin).
This eventuality may be even increased in patients with contraindication to anticoagulation.

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