anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacies of thrombolytic and standard anticoagulation therapy modalities on mortality and also to determine the safety of thrombolytic therapy in subjects with submassive PE.
However, given the risk of imminent renal graft loss due to venous outflow occlusion, mechanical thrombectomy using the AngioVac device with administration of tightly controlled short duration intraprocedural anticoagulation was considered the best option.
Similarly, out of 41 patients with >5 minutes duration AF, 25 (60.9%) had a CHA2DS2VASc score of more than 2, while 16 patient's score was between 0 to 1, which concludes that almost 61% of patients were at a higher risk of developing cerebrovascular complications related to AF and thus were candidates for life long anticoagulation therapy as shown in figure 1.
From there, the physician could choose to open an order template to prescribe evidence-based medications to prevent stroke, to elect to review evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, or to continue with the admissions order with an acknowledged reason tor omitting anticoagulation (such as high bleeding risk, low stroke risk, high risk for falls, or patient refusal of anticoagulation).
In a view of anticoagulation for DVT caused by ACD, anticoagulation for provoked DVT of PV was recommend into long-term anticoagulation with 3 months.[5] Hence, in our case, anticoagulation had been continued for 3 months despite resolution of DVT in CTA.
With the limited availability of alternative anticoagulants, a discussion on how to improve our anticoagulation monitoring to better protect our patients against life-threatening complications is overdue.
This reluctance to include anticoagulation therapy in acute or chronic, or asymptomatic SVT, may be due to the lack of suggestive guidelines or reviews.
With these variables in mind, the health care provider must make decisions regarding anticoagulation during the periprocedural period based on the following 5 questions:
Among elderly atrial fibrillation (AF) patients who underwent heart surgery with no oral follow-up oral anticoagulation, those who had the left atrial appendage surgically occluded were 74% less likely than those who did not to be readmitted for a major thromboembolic event within 3 years, and 68% less likely to be readmitted for a hemorrhagic stroke, researchers at Duke University in Durham, N.C., found.
AF was diagnosed 4 years ago, and she was started on oral anticoagulation with warfarin.
The EINSTEIN CHOICE study evaluated patients with VTE who were already treated with six to 12 months of initial anticoagulation therapy and then received XARELTO 10 mg once daily, XARELTO 20 mg once daily or aspirin 100 mg once daily for up to an additional 12 months of treatment.

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