anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Anti-inflammatory and anticoagulative effects of paeonol on LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats.
Patients diagnosed with microscopic hyphema, ruptured globe, or posterior segment injuries other than commotio retina on the initial emergency department visit, those with any systemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coagulative disorders, those who used any anticoagulative medication or had a past history of ocular surgery, children under 7 years old, and pregnant and nursing women were excluded from the study.
[23] were also able to show a decrease in antithrombin serum level, as well as a decrease in the level of protein S, a cofactor of protein C, which acts as an anticoagulative. The expression of these anticoagulative proteins differs significantly in patients who developed osteonecrosis during dexamethasone treatment as compared with patients who did not develop osteonecrosis.
Since mutated Factor V is resistant to the anticoagulative action of protein C, it cannot be activated by cleavage, causing inactivation of the antithrombotic regulatory pathway [2-3].
Anticoagulative effect of nitric oxide inhalation in ARDS.
Surgery would be the most effective approach combined with the cessation of any anticoagulative therapy.
Therefore, ulinastatin and gabexate mesilate, which possess both antifibrinolytic and anticoagulative effects, were administered (8,9).