antidiabetic


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antidiabetic

[¦an·tē‚dī·ə¦bed·ik]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as insulin, that is effective in controlling diabetes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The subject of the public contract is the supply of medicinal products from atc groups of antidiabetic drugs for the treatment of patients in approved indications.
This US FDA's approval, which was based on data from the company's LixiLan-O clinical trial in adults with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with metformin and/or a second oral antidiabetic therapy, now showed that treatment with Soliqua 100/33 led to significantly greater reductions in blood sugar levels compared with insulin glargine and lixisenatide.
A study published in the Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, found out the underlying molecular mechanism for antidiabetic property of A.indica.
Some antidiabetic drugs have also been shown to increase the risk of developing heart failure.
CM treatment caused a significant (P0.05) @ 20ml/kg bw This antidiabetic therapy of CM which showed an increase in the platelets count may be due to high level of insulin present in it.
Prior to enrolment, participants were inadequately controlled on one oral antidiabetic drug.
Research has shown that peptides successfully isolated from seaweed have antihypertensive, antioxidative and antidiabetic activities.
The safety and effects of newly licensed antidiabetic drugs on the cardiovascular system represent important clinical issues [6,7].
WASHINGTON -- The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' conclusion that insulin should be considered the first-line pharmacologic treatment for gestational diabetes came under fire at a recent meeting on diabetes in pregnancy, indicating the extent to which controversy persists over the use of oral antidiabetic medications in pregnancy.
Nature is a good source of antidiabetic drugs and plants are valuable dietary supplements to improve blood sugar control and prevent long-term complications of type 2 diabetes (2).
Provided this assumption is correct, then changes in antidiabetic medication in diabetic patients with malaria, particularly in its chronic form, should be performed with greater accentuation of structured self-monitoring of glycaemia than usual.