Coombs serum

(redirected from antihuman globulin)
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Coombs serum

[′kümz ‚sir·əm]
(immunology)
An immune serum containing antiglobulin that is used in testing for Rh and other sensitizations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the red cell membrane has CD38 receptors, daratumumab often results in a positive indirect antihuman globulin test result.
The complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay since the late 1960s has been a mainstay of pre-transplant testing for anti HLA antibodies (1,2) Many laboratories continue to report on the CDC with routine incubation timings, while others use various enhancement techniques to improve its sensitivity, two favoured ones being the use of extended incubation CDC and antihuman globulin CDC (2).
Monoclonal IgG anti-D and polyspecific antihuman globulin reagents were used for weak-D tests.
For each serum sample, the participant reported crossmatch results as either "negative" or "positive," and the method employed (tube, solid phase red cell adherence [SPRCA], gel, electronic/computer, or LMWT); for tube testing, the phase of testing was also reported (immediate spin, antihuman globulin [AHG] crossmatch with immunoglobulin G AHG, or AHG crossmatch with polyspecific AHG) and the additive solution (saline, albumin, low ionic strength solution [LISS], or polyethylene glycol [PEG]).
If negative, the mixture was washed four times with normal saline and antihuman globulin (AHG) was added.
The upper part of the column is the reaction chamber, and the lower part contains a gel with specific reagents (e.g., antihuman globulin (AHG) antisera) for a particular test.