antihypertensive agent

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antihypertensive agent

[‚an·tē‚hī·pər′ten·siv ′ā·jənt]
(pharmacology)
A substance, such as reserpine, that reduces hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixty patients were randomized into two groups, those receiving moxibustion (2 hours, 2 times weekly for 1 month, n = 30) or antihypertensive drug alone (n = 30).
On the other hand, there are studies of immediate increased risk of falls in the elderly started on antihypertensive drugs, where orthostatic hypotension is thought to be the underlying mechanism.
Doctor can choose antihypertensive class and input maximum desired cost of monthly treatment (with one drug of chosen class).
"Antihypertensive medications are reasonable targets for deintensification in residents in whom this is consistent with goals of care," the authors write.
To be included, residents had to have a diagnosis of hypertension, as defined by an ICD-9-CM code 401.xx-405.xx or item I.I.h checked in MDS 2.0 or item 10700 in MDS 3.0 in the 1 year before baseline (Simonson, Han, and Davidson 2011), and be treated with at least one first-line antihypertensive medication (thiazide diuretic, calcium channel blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, or beta-blocker) according to a major U.S.
[1] However, there is controversy with regard to treatment of mild-to-moderate elevations in BP because of exposure of the fetus to antihypertensive agents, even if it is over a relatively short period and without any evidence of benefit to the mother.
The observational study in hypertensive patients with antihypertensive drugs found two comparative facts: an improvement of blood pressure levels and an increase in salt intake.
Most of the antihypertensive therapy was stopped, maintaining only bisoprolol (2.5mg/day).
There are few studies that have directly compared blood pressure differences in antihypertensive medication users across different body mass index (BMI) categories (normal weight, overweight, and obesity) [12-14].
At present, there are only limited studies that demonstrate an increased risk of falls during the initiation of antihypertensive drugs.
In addition, during the initial evaluation, and then periodically, diabetes patients should be assessed for orthostatic hypotension "to individualize blood pressure goals, select the most appropriate antihypertensive agents, and minimize adverse effects of antihypertensive therapy," according to the recommendations.