antimony pentafluoride


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antimony pentafluoride

[′an·tə‚mō·nē ‚pent·ə′flu̇r‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
SbF5 A corrosive, hygroscopic, moderately viscous fluid; reacts violently with water; forms a clear solution with glacial acetic acid; used in the fluorination of organic compounds.
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Olah obtained his first results by mixing hydrogen fluoride with antimony pentafluoride to produce a superacid so strong it could pluck atoms from hydrocarbon molecules, leaving behind an alkyl cation -- a molecule normally too unstable to be studied.
Antimony pentafluoride is a very strong Lewis acid, indeed we may say that it is a Lewis superacid.