antineutrino

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antineutrino

[′an·tē·nü¦trē·nō]
(particle physics)
The antiparticle to the neutrino; it has zero mass, spin ½, and positive helicity; there are two antineutrinos, one associated with electrons and one with muons.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a difference were to be found between the rates of oscillations of separate neutrino and antineutrino beams, that would be proof of the imbalance between matter and antimatter.
The Daya Bay result provides the most precise measure yet of the energies of electron antineutrinos at a nuclear reactor.
The result is very exciting, because it essentially allows us to compare neutrino and antineutrino oscillations in the future and see how different they are and hopefully have an answer to the question, Why do we exist?
Normally, when the atom of a radioactive particle decays, a neutron breaks down into a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino (or a neutrino).
Antineutrinos are produced not only in the decay of uranium, thorium, and potassium isotopes but in a variety of others, including fission products in nuclear power reactors.
1919), set up the necessary detection system and snared a few antineutrinos.
For scientists still looking for these particles, the 5 MeV antineutrino anomaly detected by the NEOS experiment, (http://physicsworld.
However, to monitor foreign reactors from a distance, these large detectors must be buried underground to avoid cosmic radiation, which contributes to background noise that interferes with the antineutrino signal.
In September in Scientific Heparin, he and colleagues published the first global map of antineutrinos, harmless subatomic particles (and the antimatter cousins of neutrinos) born when radioactive elements break down.
Although antineutrinos should behave exactly the same as neutrinos, just to be safe, the MiniBooNE team decided to repeat the experiment - this time with antineutrinos.
It should be noted that an upper antiquark and an up quark usually forms an n particle, which may live about a few tens of nanoseconds and decay into other particles such as photons and pions, which further decay to nuons and nuon neutrinos and antineutrinos.
Neutrinos, and their antimatter counterpart antineutrinos, exist in three types, or "flavors" - electron, muon and tau.