antineutrino

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antineutrino

[′an·tē·nü¦trē·nō]
(particle physics)
The antiparticle to the neutrino; it has zero mass, spin ½, and positive helicity; there are two antineutrinos, one associated with electrons and one with muons.
References in periodicals archive ?
The result is very exciting, because it essentially allows us to compare neutrino and antineutrino oscillations in the future and see how different they are and hopefully have an answer to the question, Why do we exist?
Dark reds Hag hot spots; blues mark areas where antineutrinos are less bountiful.
Additional factors that have to be taken into account include how the radioactive elements are distributed (whether uniformly or concentrated in a "sunken layer" at the core-mantle boundary), variations due to radioactive elements in the local geology (in KamLAND's case, less than 10 percent of the expected flux), antineutrinos from fission products, and how neutrinos oscillate as they travel through the crust and mantle.
Reactor science Nuclear reactors near China's Daya Bay (bottom) spew antineutrinos that travel in all directions.
Interestingly, the team saw muon antineutrinos turning into electron antineutrinos at a higher rate than expected - just like at LSND.
This then indicates that if the neutrino or the antineutrino perturbs the proton, then the electron can become unstable and collapse into the proton, and combine with the proton to form a neutron (by changing the direction of one quark).
to the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, about 37 percent of muon antineutrinos disappeared--presumably morphing into another neutrino type--compared with just 19 percent of muon neutrinos, reports MINOS spokesman Robert Plunkett of Fermilab.
One surefire way to catch some is to build a detector near a concentrated source of antineutrinos.
It also revealed a much higher rate of conversion between two types of antineutrinos than standard particle physics calculations had predicted.
Nuclear decays of thorium, uranium, and the isotopes into which those elements transform give off antineutrinos.
Because antineutrinos can switch identities, just as neutrinos do, physicists also see the results as evidence of the consistency of physical laws in the universe, comments neutrino theorist S.
When a neutron decays in an unstable nucleus, the particle transforms into a proton, while an electron and an antineutrino flee the scene.