antinomianism

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antinomianism

(ăntĭnō`mēənĭzəm) [Gr.,=against the law], the belief that Christians are not bound by the moral law, particularly that of the Old Testament. The idea was strong among the Gnostics, especially MarcionMarcion
, c.85–c.160, early Christian bishop, founder of the Marcionites, one of the first great Christian heresies to rival Catholic Christianity. He was born in Sinope. He taught in Asia Minor, then went (c.135) to Rome, where he perfected his theory.
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. Certain heretical sects in the Middle Ages practiced sexual license as an expression of Christian freedom. In the Protestant Reformation theoretical antinomian views were maintained by the Anabaptists and Johann Agricola, and in the 17th cent. Anne Hutchinson was persecuted for supposed antinomianism. Rom. 6 is the usual refutation for antinomianism.
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antinomianism

the beliefs held, e.g. by the members of some Protestant sects in the 16th and 17th centuries, that, as members of ‘God's elect’, they could no longer be guilty of sin. As WEBER (1922) put it, such persons felt themselves ‘certain of salvation’, and ‘no longer bound by any conventional rule of conduct’. This belief was interpreted by some believers as permitting them to engage in unorthodox marital practices, including plural marriages, as well as in sexual activity outside marriage, which they justified as bringing others to salvation. Weber's view was that antinomianism is a generally occurring phenomenon, and that the more systematically the ‘practical psychological character’ of a religious faith develops, the greater is the tendency for antinomianism to be the outcome.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Mary literalizes what, for antinomian believers, is purely theoretical: the internalized Christ guides her.
He argues that Buddhist antinomian traditions originated from Buddhist monastic professionals rather than outcast or tribal communities, as previously examined.
These two versions of an antinomian poetics suggest that writing
Malcolm X is not antinomian in the way that King is.
Already in 1989 Carl-tractator bemoaned the initial assembly of the ELCA: "What we have witnessed in this convention was one more step forward in the making of an American Protestant denomination," which for him means, "one more step backwards." (9) In 1991 Carl-treatiser investigated full-fledged "apostasy in American theology" but Carl-tractator used that inquiry to allege "the il/legitimacy of Lutheranism in America," in which "the confessional core of Lutheranism was vanishing before our eyes" (Memoirs, 140), hopelessly deluged by an "antinomian ...
He famously got into a tussle with John Winthrop over their interpretation of the Bible, the religious crisis known as the Antinomian Controversy.
Socially conservative notions have also been generally overwhelmed by the antinomian "North American" pop-culture and the consumer society.
It is clearly this specifically Antinomian notion that is of most interest to Hogg and thus to Gil-Martin, for when Robert sheepishly admits to his companion that he "did not think the Scripture promises to the elect, taken in their utmost latitude, warranted the assurance that they could do no wrong," he is instantly rebuked.
A year earlier, he established Antinomian Press to publish material about project art; in doing so, he discovered many artists whose work involved exploring issues of labor outside the traditional support systems of the art world, such as Lee Lozano and Christopher D'Arcangelo.
Moreover, the extreme displays of the Alline years and the antinomian episodes of the 1790s were never of the essence for Regular Baptists.
To turn next to Clarissa might seem perverse, but Conway makes a strong case that Richardson's implacably virtuous protagonist allows him, within the microcosm of the family, to investigate quasi-monarchical authority in ways reminiscent of Behn: Clarissa's "radical antinomian impulses ...
Harvey links this often-overlooked challenge to the Antinomian conflict with Hutchinson's view of modesty in the public sphere.