antiquary


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antiquary

a person who collects, deals in, or studies antiques, ancient works of art, or ancient times
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
Still the severer antiquary may think, that, by thus intermingling fiction with truth, I am polluting the well of history with modern inventions, and impressing upon the rising generation false ideas of the age which I describe.
Abbotsford and The Antiquary share a tropic relationship between genealogy and archaeology: in romance, be it linguistic or architectural, identity, too, is "concretized" by assembling heritage objects in a particular location and ideological context.
In The Antiquary, these threads of inheritance and cultural production come explicitly together.
Our winner will also get a grand tour of the Tomatin Distillery and will be presented with a 70cl bottle of The Antiquary.
Scottish poet and literary antiquary who maintained national poetic traditions by writing Scots poetry and by preserving the work of earlier Scottish poets.
A popular modern belief that he was of the time of Richard I probably stems from a "pedigree" fabricated by an 18th-century antiquary, William Stukeley.
As regards the wreck of La Jeune Emma, your reporter might like to consider my article published in The Carmarthenshire Antiquary in 2017 - New Light on an Old Shipwreck, the Loss of La Jeune Emma,1828.
He covers education and early experience, Strada as an imperial architect, The Musaeum, and the antiquary and the agent of change.
Forster's influential Aspects of the Novel (1927), which quotes the beginning of the then more than a century old The Antiquary (1816) by Walter Scott:
The new year could bring a new cultural centre in antiquarian bookshop.One of the biggest antiquarian bookshops in Europe, the estate of the deceased antiquary Tibor urak from Leopoldov, has been stored in Trnava in the office building Tatrasklo for several months.
We might, however, recognise Scott's caution against blithely following literary footsteps from the example of the coach that, in The Antiquary (1816), leaves Lovel and the title character stranded by the tide at the Hawes inn.