antisatellite missile

antisatellite missile

[an·tē′sad·ə‚līt ‚mis·əl]
(ordnance)
A missile whose target is an orbiting satellite.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) In 2007, China tested an antisatellite missile against one of its failing weather satellites, projecting debris that continues to threaten space-based assets to this day.
(7) China also has a number of antisatellite capabilities, such as direct-ascent antisatellite missiles, co-orbital antisatellite systems, computer network operations, ground-based satellite jammers, and directed-energy weapons.
Early in the movie Gravity, a Russian antisatellite missile test unleashes a cloud of debris that shreds the International Space Station.
(64.) "Request to Allies for New Demarche"; and Ghulam Murtaza Khoso, "Chinese AntiSatellite Missile Test," Area Study Center-Far East and South East Asia, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan, July 2007, http://www.fesea.org/publications/monthly/factfile/Factfile7.pdf; Keith Cowing, "Congressional Reaction to Chinese ASAT test," 19 January 2007, http:// nasawatch.com/archives/2007/01/congressional-reaction-to-chinese-asat-test.html; and Marc Kaufman and Dafna Lizner, "China Criticized for Anti-Satellite Missile Test," Washington Post, 19 January 2007.
NEW YORK - American intelligence agencies had issued reports about the preparations being made by China to conduct an antisatellite missile test but ultimately decided to say nothing to Beijing until after the test, the New York Times reported Monday.
In return for a moratorium on antisatellite missile testing, liberals sanctioned a defense budget authority for fiscal 1986 that is higher than the $302.5 billion voted by the Republican-controlled Senate.
After the Chinese antisatellite missile test in 2007 and Russia's successful flight test of an antisatellite missile in May 2016, space no longer remains an uncontested mission area for any spacefaring nation.
Air Force antisatellite missile in a test of the ASAT program.
For example, China conducted successful antisatellite missile tests in 2007 and 2014.
The growth in the last decade in counterspace capabilities--kinetic means such as direct ascent antisatellite missiles, co-orbital systems (satellites that sidle up to their targets and detonate to kill both) that create permanent and irreversible destruction, and even electronic or cyber means to create temporary disruptions and/or destruction--is a major emerging problem.
Both the United States and Soviet Union developed a range of antisatellite missiles during the Cold War.
The OTA warned that Soviet nuclear antisatellite missiles could pose a significant threat to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), especially if the system came under attack before it was fully operational.