antiseptic


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Related to antiseptic: antiseptic drugs

antiseptic,

agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the external surfaces of the body. Antiseptics should generally be distinguished from drugs such as antibiotics that destroy microorganisms internally, and from disinfectants, which destroy microorganisms found on nonliving objects. Germicides include only those antiseptics that kill microorganisms. Some common antiseptics are alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. There is great variation in the ability of antiseptics to destroy microorganisms and in their effect on living tissue. For example, mercuric chloride is a powerful antiseptic, but it irritates delicate tissue. In contrast, silver nitrate kills fewer germs but can be used on the delicate tissues of the eyes and throat. There is also a great difference in the time required for different antiseptics to work. Iodine, one of the fastest-working antiseptics, kills bacteria within 30 sec. Other antiseptics have slower, more residual action. Since so much variability exists, systems have been devised for measuring the action of an antiseptic against certain standards. The bacteriostatic action of an antiseptic compared to that of phenol (under the same conditions and against the same microorganism) is known as its phenol coefficient. Joseph Lister was the first to employ the antiseptic phenol, or carbolic acid, in surgery, following the discovery by Louis Pasteur that microorganisms are the cause of infections. Modern surgical techniques for avoiding infection are founded on asepsis, the absence of pathogenic organisms. Sterilization is the chief means of achieving asepsis.

antiseptic

[¦an·tə¦sep·tik]
(microbiology)
A substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in the human or animal body.

antiseptic

an agent or substance that prevents infection by killing germs
References in periodicals archive ?
At press time, FDA said three active ingredients--benzalkonium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and isopropyl alcohol--are being deferred from further rulemaking to allow for the ongoing study and submission of additional safety and effectiveness data necessary to make a determination regarding whether these active ingredients are generally recognized as safe and effective for use in OTC consumer antiseptic rub products.
BD added that the new BD ChloraPrep product uses a proprietary and patented process to sterilize the antiseptic solution inside the sealed ampoules located in the BD applicator.
Weleda Calendula Spray A traditional tincture using natural healer calendula, known for its antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties.
The primary outcome was diagnosis of a superficial, deep, or organ space SSI within 30 days of surgery, while the primary predictor was whether the individual cases received either the chlorhexidine-alcohol or the povidone-iodine antiseptic solution.
Customers have reported that devices made with Versaflex HC TPEs successfully withstood 10,000 antiseptic wipes.
After repeated exposure to antiseptics, the new TPE grades resist overmolding delamination, cracking, and loss of resilience.
"There is just no difference between urine and Dettol since both are antiseptic. During our childhood days, we used to apply it on cuts and bruises as it worked as antiseptic but now it has been replaced by Dettol - Some people also use it to wash their hands.
A predesigned proforma was used to record patient's demographics, diagnosis, surgical procedure, use of prophylactic antibiotic, antiseptic agent (povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine), patient's outcome and follow-up.
"Today's proposal seeks to ensure the FDA's evaluations and determinations for all health care antiseptic active ingredients are consistent, up-to-date and appropriately reflect current scientific knowledge and patterns of use by health care professionals," Dr.