antiseptic

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antiseptic,

agent that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the external surfaces of the body. Antiseptics should generally be distinguished from drugs such as antibiotics that destroy microorganisms internally, and from disinfectants, which destroy microorganisms found on nonliving objects. Germicides include only those antiseptics that kill microorganisms. Some common antiseptics are alcohol, iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. There is great variation in the ability of antiseptics to destroy microorganisms and in their effect on living tissue. For example, mercuric chloride is a powerful antiseptic, but it irritates delicate tissue. In contrast, silver nitrate kills fewer germs but can be used on the delicate tissues of the eyes and throat. There is also a great difference in the time required for different antiseptics to work. Iodine, one of the fastest-working antiseptics, kills bacteria within 30 sec. Other antiseptics have slower, more residual action. Since so much variability exists, systems have been devised for measuring the action of an antiseptic against certain standards. The bacteriostatic action of an antiseptic compared to that of phenol (under the same conditions and against the same microorganism) is known as its phenol coefficient. Joseph Lister was the first to employ the antiseptic phenol, or carbolic acid, in surgery, following the discovery by Louis Pasteur that microorganisms are the cause of infections. Modern surgical techniques for avoiding infection are founded on asepsis, the absence of pathogenic organisms. Sterilization is the chief means of achieving asepsis.
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antiseptic

[¦an·tə¦sep·tik]
(microbiology)
A substance used to destroy or prevent the growth of infectious microorganisms on or in the human or animal body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

antiseptic

an agent or substance that prevents infection by killing germs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This could help explain why the struggle for gay rights has itself become so antiseptically wholesome in recent years--and why the intersection of "sex" and "Abraham Lincoln" shot right over most people's heads.
Designer Alison Chitty--a regular Gill collaborator--keeps the Donmar stage antiseptically clean, various props lined up against a back wall whose overhead walk-way doubles for the couple's beloved Westminster Bridge.
Marines, Special Forces, and Air Force fighter and bomber aircraft at least six sites in Israel, all part of what is antiseptically described as 'U.S.-Israel strategic cooperation.'"
In the course of decades of work, he collected many thousands of photographs of men and women in standardized, antiseptically posed, front, side, and rear views, from which he took measurements and published statistics.
The primitive wilderness of the conquered people, the white man's imaginary Other, is in a first stage viewed like "something great and invincible, like evil or truth" (166); it is "that dumb thing" (171) standing up "spectrally in the moonlight" absorbing and pouring forth the bodies of black men (223), beyond the fence of civilization which is thus, as Edward Said notes, "antiseptically quarantined from its worldly affiliations"--or, I would suggest, here otherworldly (op.
Paz invented the term to refer to abstract, almost antiseptically banal concepts like 'progress', 'development', 'revolution' which, when empirically applied as policy, extracted an enormous cost in terms of cultures destroyed and lives lost.
I have admired Haneke's films in the past, beginning with the antiseptically grim The Seventh Continent and going on to the tough, much-maligned Benny's Video.
"What has been rather antiseptically referred to as a 'racial disparity' is really a gaping divide between whites and nonwhites that far outstrips minority levels in the population or in committing crime.
Keeping mineral water bottles antiseptically clean during the filling process is always a challenge, especially in the tropical climate of Southeast Asia.
Educators generally consider discussions of race and racism as volatile topics within the curriculum for K-12 schools and teacher education and tend to handle these multicultural topics antiseptically or simply avoid them.
The antiseptically white walls of the new galleries contrast with murkier spaces where the original concrete structure and chunky octagonal columns have been retained.
Due to increasing global interdependencies, there is no way to antiseptically separate the rich and poor countries anymore.