antiserum


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antiserum

blood serum containing antibodies against a specific antigen, used to treat or provide immunity to a disease

antiserum

[′an·tē‚sir·əm]
(immunology)
The serum component of blood that contains antibodies specific to one or more antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recombinant protein of SL was used to raise antiserum in rabbit as described previously [32].
The commercial antiserum to BNP(1-32) recognized the inner portion of the amino-terminal arm of BNP and the precursor proBNP, which contains this epitope.
Method controls to validate the specificity of the binding of immunocytochemical reagents with tissue included: 1) omission of the primary antiserum, 2) replacement of the primary antiserum with nonimmune serum, 3) dilution profile of the primary antiserum using doubling dilutions on serial sections, 4) influence of the salt content (up to 0.
Finally, in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of the polyclonal antiserum was determined using primarily cultured pig adipocytes and piglets, respectively.
Although antiserum is the only available medical antidote against snakebite (Calmette, 1894), it does not provide enough protection against venom-induced hemorrhage, necrosis, or nephrotoxicity, and it often produces adverse hypersensitivity reactions (Corrigan et al.
The continuing relatively high variance among RPPHS-based RM for some proteins is probably the result of several factors, including differences in antiserum reactivity, fragmentation of proteins in RM, and the transfer of values to manufacturers' RM by methods less precise than the method recommended by the IFCC C-PP.
Antibodies to coagulogen failed to immunostain dot blots of coticular secretion, and the anti-cuticular secretion antiserum failed to stain coagulogen or the collective secretion of the blood cells.
The positive reaction to cat antiserum on the one unifacially retouched flake from DEL-168 indicates protein from a member of the Felidae.
As with all immunological techniques, CIEP requires (1) the production and isolation of antibodies (antiserum) to known plants and animals, (2) the removal and isolation of plant or animal residue from artifacts or sediment, (3) the exposure of the plant or animal residue to a series of antiserum, and (4) methods for observing the strength of the reaction of the antiserum to the unknown residue.
The antibodies in rabbit serum, called antiserum, can then be used to search for deer blood.
Viruses in this group react poorly with antiserum to the 1989-90 vaccine strain (A/Shanghai/11/87); however, antiserum prepared to these viruses reacted well with A/Shanghai/11/87-like viruses from the 1989-90 season.