antitussive


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antitussive

[¦an·tē¦təs·iv]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as benylin expectorants, that relieves coughing.
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The results of their study cover a broad spectrum of pharmacological functions such as anti-inflammatories, antioxidants, anticancer agents, anthelmintics, antidiarrheals, antitussives, antivirals (Davis et al., 1984), biological activity and biocides, among others (Garcia et al., 2010).
BLU-5937 is a highly selective, orally bioavailable small molecule antagonist of the P2X3 receptor exhibiting a potent antitussive effect without affecting taste perception and showing an excellent safety profile in preclinical studies.
Isolation of novel biflavonoids from Cardiocrinum giganteum seeds and characterization of their antitussive activities.
CDCA has significant anti-inflammatory, antitussive, and expectorant effects [1]; CDCA is used for the medical treatment of metabolic diseases for it can reduce or dissolve cholesterol gall-stones in vivo [2].
In recent years, novel antitussives are under development, but the primary outcome measure of antitussive drugs is still subjective, which harms the interests of patients.
Do not give children who are younger than 6 years old cough medicines with any of the active ingredients listed above (antitussive, expectorants, antihistamines, or decongestants), highlighted.
The leaves are used as antitussive in the form of herbal tea and the fruits with high nutrient value are used for the treatment of diarrhea (Tuzlaci, 2006).
Nepeta species are used as the traditional medicine in many countries and have a large ethno-botanical effects like diuretic, diaphoretic, vulnerary, antitussive, antispasmodic, antiasthmatic, tonic, febrifuge and carminative (Ghannadi et al., 2003).
Bulbous Fritillaria which is derived from bulbous of various Fritillaria species, has been used as one of the most important antitussive, expectorant and antihypertensive drugs in traditional Chines medicine (Kang 2002; 2004; Wang 2012).
The leading and diverse medical purposes for which desomorphine or Permonid[R] was sold as hydrobromic acid salt included analgesic, antitussive and even sedative uses.
It is used in China for treatment of bronchitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, peptic ulcers, asthma, malaria, abdominal pain, insomnia, and infections.(5) It has been shown to have estrogenic, aldosterone-like, cortisol-like (antiinflammatory), antiallergic, antibacterial, antiviral, antihepatotoxic, anticancer, expectorant, and antitussive properties.