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Related to antiviral resistance: Resistance to antiviral drugs

resistance

, in electricity
resistance, property of an electric conductor by which it opposes a flow of electricity and dissipates electrical energy away from the circuit, usually as heat. Optimum resistance is provided by a conductor that is long, small in cross section, and of a material that conducts poorly. Resistance is basically the same for alternating and direct current circuits (see impedance). However, an alternating current of high frequency tends to travel near the surface of a conductor. Since such a current uses less of the available cross section of the conductor than a direct current, it meets with more resistance than a direct current. In circuit analysis an ideal resistor, i.e., a circuit component whose only property is resistance, is called a resistance. The phenomenon of resistance arises from the interactions of electrons with ions in the conductor. The unit of resistance is the ohm. See superconductivity; Ohm's law; conduction.
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Resistance

The physical property of a material to resist or impede the conduction of electrical current, measured in ohms. High resistance means poor conductivity and vice versa.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

resistance

[ri′zis·təns]
(acoustics)
(electricity)
The opposition that a device or material offers to the flow of direct current, equal to the voltage drop across the element divided by the current through the element. Also known as electrical resistance.
In an alternating-current circuit, the real part of the complex impedance.
(fluid mechanics)
(mechanics)
In damped harmonic motion, the ratio of the frictional resistive force to the speed. Also known as damping coefficient; damping constant; mechanical resistance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

electrical resistance

The physical property of a device, conductor, element, branch, or system, by virtue of which power is lost as heat when current flows through it; the physical property which an electric conductor exhibits to the flow of current; measured in ohms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

resistance

1. 
a. the opposition to a flow of electric current through a circuit component, medium, or substance. It is the magnitude of the real part of the impedance and is measured in ohms.
b. (as modifier): resistance coupling
2. any force that tends to retard or oppose motion
3. (in psychoanalytical theory) the tendency of a person to prevent the translation of repressed thoughts and ideas from the unconscious to the conscious and esp to resist the analyst's attempt to bring this about
4. Physics the magnitude of the real part of the acoustic or mechanical impedance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Testing for seasonal influenza viruses and monitoring for novel influenza A virus infections should continue year-round, as should specimen submission to CDC for further antigenic and genetic analysis and antiviral resistance monitoring.
Updated information about antiviral resistance in influenza viruses in the United States is available at www.
Testing for seasonal influenza and monitoring for novel influenza virus infections should continue year-round, as should specimen submission to CDC for further antigenic and genetic analysis and antiviral resistance monitoring.
We considered identical matches on all 4 variables as a high probability match, e.g., a patient from FluSurv-NET who had a pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus specimen submitted to national antiviral resistance surveillance who had an oseltamivir-susceptible pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection.
Multiple specimens were available from patients D, E, and G for analyzing antiviral resistance mutations in NA.
Antiviral Resistance Profiles of Influenza Virus Isolates
A more realistic model would take into consideration possible development of resistance over time (37), but a detailed analysis of antiviral resistance was beyond the scope of our analysis.
Since October 1, 2010, a total of 5,758 influenza virus specimens have been tested for antiviral resistance. All 723 influenza B viruses tested were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Although the recently detected oseltamivir-resistant pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in Hong Kong was not a reassortant virus (4,5), we will continue to closely monitor antiviral drug resistance among circulating viruses, including pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus and seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1), as well as influenza A (H3N2) viruses, to track how antiviral resistance evolves.
Since October 1, 2010, a total of 364 influenza virus isolates have been tested for antiviral resistance. Of the 158 influenza A (H3N2) and 119 influenza B viruses tested, 100% were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.
Indiscriminant administration of these agents could support proliferation of antiviral resistance in pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus or an evolved variant.
Since October 1, a total of 104 influenza viruses have been tested for antiviral resistance. Of the 17 2009 influenza A (H1N1), 33 influenza A (H3N2), and 54 influenza B viruses tested, all were sensitive to both oseltamivir and zanamivir.