aortitis


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aortitis

[‚ā‚ȯr′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the aorta.
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Aortitis in early life in India and its association with tuberculosis.
Old New Mikulicz's IgG4-related disease dacryoadenitis and sialadenitis Sclerosing Kuttner's tumor, sialadenitis IgG4-related submandibular gland disease Inflammatory IgG4-related orbital orbital inflammation or pseudotumor orbital inflammatory pseudotumor Chronic Lacrimal gland sclerosing enlargement, dacryoadenitis IgG4-related dacryoadenitis Idiopathic' IgG4-related retroperitoneal retroperitoneal fibrosis, fibrosis (Ormond's IgG4-related mesenteritis disease) andrelated disorders Chronic sclerosing IgG4-related aortitis or aortitis and periaortitis periaortitis Riedel's IgG4-related thyroid thyroiditis disease IgG4-related IgG4-related lung disease interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary inflammatory pseudotumors IgG4-RD: immunoglobulin G4-relateddisease.
Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast showed inflammatory changes of infrarenal aorta consistent with aortitis. Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis was isolated from multiple blood cultures.
We report the case of a 38-year-old pregnant lady with a diagnosis of idiopathic aortitis associated with aortic root aneurysm and severe aortic valve regurgitation.
Legemate, "Aortitis with aneurysm formation as a rare complication of Wegener's granulomatosis," Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol.
Other causes, such as septic aortitis, tuberculosis, cancer, radiation, and foreign bodies , are less frequent (12).
Extracranial carotid artery pseudoaneurysms and aneurysms are extremely rare, altogether accounting for only 0.4-4% of all peripheral artery aneurysms.6-8 Studies have shown the incidence of 0.02%-0.4% of carotid pseudoaneurysms among all trauma patients.9 Post-traumatic saccular carotid aneurysms most often involve the mid segment of the cervical internal carotid artery.8 Although fusiform enlargement of the mediastinal segment of the left common carotid artery can occur in atherosclerotic disease and in some types of aortitis but a saccular pseudoaneurysm in this location has been recorded only in a few instances after major blunt chest trauma.8
A case of severe reversible dilated cardiomyopathy associated with a large left ventricular thrombus in a young child possibly due to non-specific aortitis who successfully underwent stent angioplasty with no residual coarctation, with normal upper extremity blood pressures and improved LV size and function was reported by Ponniah et al.6 Our case highlights the importance of excluding the potential reversible cause like coarctation, critical aortic stenosis, and aortitis before diagnosing Dilated Cardiomyopathy.7
Furthermore, given that animal studies have shown that encephalitozoonosis can cause vasculitic manifestations, including aortitis (29) and artertitis (30) in primates, the intracerebral pathology of the donor might have been associated with occult disseminated E.