aperture antenna

aperture antenna

[′ap·ə‚chər an′ten·ə]
(electromagnetism)
Antenna in which the beam width is determined by the dimensions of a horn, lens, or reflector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mousavi, "A dual-band low-profile aperture antenna with substrate-integrated waveguide grooves," IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol.
"Design of band notched ultrawideband square aperture antenna with a hat-shaped back-patch," IEEE Trans.
Hung, "Compact ultrawideband rectangular aperture antenna and band-notched designs," IEEE Trans.
These fields are assumed to be known and are produced by the waveguide which feeds the aperture antenna mounted on the infinite ground plane.
Meanwhile, this concept is employed to design reconfigurable aperture antenna and unit cell of fractal structure as a frequency selective surface [7, 8].
Wu, "Microstripline-fed circularly -polarized aperture antenna," IEEE AP-S Int.
The coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed aperture antenna consists of an aperture that is etched from a ground plane having a bow-tie shape and a CPW feed line that protrudes through the aperture.
In 1983, Randtron Antenna Systems (now a division of L3 Communications in Menlo Park, CA) developed a common aperture antenna with performance equal to or better than a spiral antenna of the same size and capable of simultaneously receiving both senses of circular polarization.
There are two primary components that make up a radio telescope: the antenna and the receiving system, in which a large aperture antenna is its main component [1, 2].
A total of eight layers--three metal, three metallized dielectric substrates and two foam layers--constitute the overall geometry of the stripline-fed, printed aperture antenna. Figure 1 shows the side view of the antenna structure.