aphtha

(redirected from aphthous)
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Related to aphthous: aphthae, aphthous stomatitis

aphtha

[‚af·thə]
(medicine)
White, painful oral ulcer of unknown cause.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effectiveness of vitamin B12 in treating recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial," Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, vol.
Results: Fifty seven (57) age and gender matched patients with recurrent aphthous ulcers and 57 normal healthy controls were studied.
Crohn's disease can present with subtle extra-intestinal symptoms, such as aphthous ulcers; arthritic complaints (especially knee joint pain); growth failure or deceleration; delayed puberty; eye problems (blurred vision, painful and red eyes) including uveitis, iritis, and episcleritis; erythema nodosum; pyoderma gangrenosum; and finger clubbing (Haas-Beckert & Heyman, 2004; Hyams, 2005; Rose, Vogiatzi, & Copeland, 2005; Wine et al.
During the last month of treatment, a significant number of participants in the intervention group reached 'no aphthous ulcers status' (74.
A randomized, controlled trial of tonsillectomy in periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis syndrome.
Vitamin B12 safely relieves recurrent aphthous stomatitis (i.
Reddy, they are most likely aphthous ulcers, or canker sores.
Several studies have linked canker sores (also known as aphthous ulcers) to low levels of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A, C, E, thiamin, calcium and iron.
NEW YORK -- Dental enamel defects and aphthous ulcers are both strongly associated with celiac disease, and should be followed up with a full investigation for the disorder in undiagnosed people, Theologos Malahias, D.
A patient with history of aphthous ulcers who now has a large ulcer, which persists despite treatment with Dexamethasone elixir
Examples include, but are not limited to, studies of the effects of beliefs, affective states, or stress on the immune system as related to the onset, progression, or treatment of oral diseases or conditions such as periodontal diseases, caries, head and neck cancers, temporomandibular joint and/or muscle disorders, herpetic and aphthous lesions, oral manifestations of HIV infection, or oral mucosal wound healing following oral surgery.