apical bud

apical bud

[′ap·i·kəl ‚bəd]
(botany)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experiments with pea seedlings have shown that lower buds are stirred into activity in as few as four hours after apical bud removal.
The tea garden set up and botanical variables range from naturally grown bushes to methodically in-line planted gardens, from bushes that have always been hand-plucked and pruned to new varieties growing straight upright with very apical bud sets, easy to be cleanly seized by the machines.
Jaunpuri revealed maximum callus induction with 1.0 mgl-l BAP and 1.5 mgl-1 2,4- D in eight days as compared to internode, apical bud and leaf.
"Requiring an intact rhizome with the apical bud present also prohibits the formerly common practice of cutting off the rhizome and replanting it immediately on site," where often it would regrow, explains Breyfuss.
Any leaf, vegetative bud, or floral bud that arises from the node at the leaf axil is called an axillary bud, whereas the one that arises from the top is the apical bud. Stems are typically terminated by meristems that can produce additional vegetative or floral growth.
Long before regulation of growth by plant hormones was discovered, botanists recognized that the apical bud causes lateral bud suppression.
Auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), a plant hormone is synthesized in the youngest leaves of the apical bud. Transported downward, auxin is known to have a role in controlling apical dominance, stem elongation, tropisms, and root development.
The centre is also examining the effect of `tipping out' cotton plants (removing the apical bud) on cotton yield.
The stolon tips had an apical bud and two nodes on which the youngest expanding leaf was kept.
The needles (up to 9 inches on mature longleaf), form a protective heat barrier around the apical bud, nestled at the base of the fragile-looking seedling.