apical bud

apical bud

[′ap·i·kəl ‚bəd]
(botany)
References in periodicals archive ?
When the apical bud of aging trunks is cut at the ground, it kills that stem but stimulates the growth of new stems in the clump.
If the apical bud remains undamaged, the plants grow fairly symmetrically and begin to compete with each other for space in the row.
The needles (up to 9 inches on mature longleaf), form a protective heat barrier around the apical bud, nestled at the base of the fragile-looking seedling.
Cutting the terminal or apical bud on any shoot means removing the source of hormones that inhibit lateral branching and ultimately more shoot tips, means more blooms in the spring - especially on roses and other terminal flowering species - than if the plants were left alone.
Auxin (indole acetic acid), a plant growth hormone, is synthesized primarily in the apical bud (1).
The plant hormone auxin (indole acetic acid) is produced primarily in the youngest leaves of the apical bud (1).
Decapitation and hormone manipulation experiments have shown growth control of the lower buds by the shoot apex is due to the plant hormone auxin (indole acetic acid) which is produced primarily in the youngest leaves of the apical bud (I).
Later instar larvae leave the mines and bore into stalks, apical buds, and fruits (Ferracini et al.
CBSV was detected in flowers, fruits, apical buds, young tender leaves, newly open leaves, youngest symptomatic leaves, tender-top green stem portions and non-necrotic storage root tissues.
When potato plants grew sufficiently, the apical buds were removed with an aim to grow lateral buds and produce more branches.