apical dominance


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apical dominance

[′ap·i·kəl ′däm·ə·nəns]
(botany)
Inhibition of lateral bud growth by the apical bud of a shoot, believed to be a response to auxins produced by the apical bud.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Genetic variation in apical dominance of Cedrela odorata seedlings in response to decapitation.
Even within a single species, plants vary in their tendency to express apical dominance. Fuchsia cultivars 'Beacon Delight' and 'Blue Ribbon' express strong apical dominance, so they're easier to train upright into miniature trees (called "standards") than are trailing cultivars, such as 'Basket Girl' and 'Blue Satin,' which have weak apical dominance.
Can loss of apical dominance in potato tuber serve as a marker of physiological age?
Growth and flowering response of snapdragons after release from apical dominance. Journal of Applied Horticulture, 8: 25-28.
Auxin Apical dominance, stimulates root growth (in cuttings and in tissue culture); tropisms.
These processes include photoperiodism, shoot elongation, apical dominance, shade avoidance, and root development.
Auxins have been found responsible for phototropism, geotropism, and apical dominance.
Overcompensation has been reported for many plants where the principal mechanism appears to involve the removal of apical dominance via herbivory of the shoot apical meristem, thus releasing lateral meristems and increasing the growth and fitness potential of the plant (Harris, 1974; Maschinski and Whitham, 1989; Aarssen and Irwin, 1991; Whitham et al., 1991).
Apical dominance asserted over lateral buds by the gall of Rhabdophaga strobiloides (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).
A substantial body of experimental work has investigated the control of dormancy and apical dominance in Marsilea (e.g., Chenou-Fleury, 1975; Sossountzov, 1976; Sossountzov & Chenou, 1978; Chenou et al., 1978, 1982; Habricot & Sossountzov, 1984a, 1984b; Sossountzov & Habricot, 1985; Sossountzov et al., 1985).
We discuss the possible role of apical dominance in the interpretation of this correlation and compare genetic and environmental correlations.