apiculture

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Related to apicultural: apiarist

apiculture

[′ā·pə‚kəl·chər]
(agriculture)
Large-scale commercial beekeeping.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bienefeld, "Subjective evaluation of defensive behavior in the Syrian honeybee (Apis mellifera syriaca)," Journal of Apicultural Science, vol.
Apicultural products such as bee pollen, honey, and royal jelly are popular agricultural products in the world.
Feeding essential oils and 2--heptanone in sugar sysup and liquid protein diets to honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) controls newspaper of Apicultural Research and Bee World, 48(4): 256-262.
The tree crops and the evergreen plants in the location, besides supplying apicultural resources to the bees equally provided sufficient shade that prevented the hive from solar radiation but enabled sunshine for apicultural activities.
From Tom Newlin we learn that Tolstoy's passion for beekeeping arose at a time of great apicultural change in Russia, when modern frame hives had begun to appear alongside the traditional log hives, and that he appears to have used Polish beekeeper Jan Dolinovsky's manual, translated into Russian in 1861, as his principal handbook (Newlin 371).
Apicultural practices driven by the economics of the industry such as transporting hives for pollination services, have contributed to the spread of Varroa and a newly arrived and possibly more virulent species of Nosema.
Dr Nicola Bradbear, an internationally-recognised expert in apicultural development, will give a talk about the work of Bees for Development, the charity she founded, which assists beekeepers living in poor and remote areas of the world.
Key Words: Slum gum; Apicultural products; Carcass characteristics; Feed intake; Weight gain
Parvan, archaeologist and specialist in the antique history, speaking of the period after the year 1000, referred to the flourishing of trade: "From the Black Sea and Adriatic to the North Sea and the Baltic, the traffic never stops." Within this context the exchange of goods was very active and the Dacian apicultural products are supposed to have been in great demand.
Another Section A entry with an apicultural moniker, 13-year-old Heathside Honey Bee, was in the money too, fetching pounds 6,500.