apocalypticism

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apocalypticism

discourse that refers to theological and secular theories of the end of the world. Beyond its origins in biblical scripture, apocalyptic thought is often related to significant dates or moments of great historical change. The years 999 and 1999 both saw an increase in theories surrounding the prophesied end of the world. At times of profound historical change groups like the Diggers, Levellers, and Luddites have all informed and reflected apocalyptic belief systems. Often this form of knowledge can be equated with an anxious fear about the nature of OTHERNESS. As later examples show, contemporary apocalypticism frequently mixes with conspiratorial thought to produce events such as the Waco massacre and the Heaven's Gate suicides. In these instances apocalypticism tends to overlap millenarian thought. In the latter, the idea of the absolute end of the world is replaced by the notion of a relative apocalyptic that will result in the rebirth of a better social order. Thus the tension between UTOPIA/DYSTOPIA is implicit in apocalyptic discourse. Some examples, such as the image of the nuclear apocalypse, tend to stress the idea of absolute dystopic destruction, while others, such as the Calvinist world-view discussed by Max Weber, reflect the concept of the relative apocalypse, i.e., the dystopic death of a rotten social order and rebirth of a new ‘just’ utopian world.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Commuters by rail and road all face delays after trains were cancelled and traffic lights stopped working during rush hour, with the scene at Clapham Junction described by one commuter as "something out of an apocalyptic film".
The early twenty-first century has seen a wave of American apocalyptic programs becoming more concrete, and in many the apocalypse actually occurs, often in the first episode.
This article examines apocalyptic discourses in Indonesia, with special reference to jihadism.
Arguably, one of King's most celebrated novels, 'The Stand' is a post apocalyptic work set in a world that has been half wiped out by a plague.
Kurzweil's notion of the Singularity (which entails human merging with advanced A.I.) is sometimes disparagingly referred to as the "rapture for the nerds." Certainly, there has been much written about religion and transhumanism, which also embraces the notion of the "Singularity." (20) Robert Geraci argues that many of the founders and luminaries in the development of artificial intelligence have been influenced by secularized forms of Christian and Jewish apocalypticism which he calls "apocalyptic A.I." (21) I will return to consider Geraci's thought later in this essay, but the discussion regarding the dangers and promises of superintelligence have largely ignored religious considerations.
(2) Lucke's use of the term in this context points to the close connection between "apocalyptic" and writings that were eventually characterized as "apocalypses." Distinct from "an apocalypse" or "the apocalypse" as an event, "apocalypse" is a genre of revelatory literature that typically includes a visionary experience mediated by otherworldly figures and/or an otherworldly journey.
Similar to an apocalyptic scene, Part of a Hollywood cinematic Frantic storyline planned film, Some days ago I'd sat in an auditorium To gaze at a silver screen; 35 years on Did reality come to the fore?
Anthony Aveni; APOCALYPTIC ANXIETY; University Press of Colorado (Nonfiction: Religion) 28.95 ISBN: 9781607324706
The guns are being released under the moniker of Apocalyptic Desert Eagles.
Unlike the band of survivors in The Night of the Living Dead (Romero, 1968) or Melanie Daniels in The Birds (Hitchcock, 1964), who encounter a series of portents of the approaching apocalypse, the viewer of The Time of the Wolf is forced to read the apocalyptic event retroactively through symptoms inscribed upon this transformed, traumatized world.
Augustine and Apocalyptic. Edited by John Doody, Kari Kloos, and Kim Paffenroth.