apocalypticism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to apocalypticism: eschatology, Sanhedrin, Parousia, Gentiles

apocalypticism

discourse that refers to theological and secular theories of the end of the world. Beyond its origins in biblical scripture, apocalyptic thought is often related to significant dates or moments of great historical change. The years 999 and 1999 both saw an increase in theories surrounding the prophesied end of the world. At times of profound historical change groups like the Diggers, Levellers, and Luddites have all informed and reflected apocalyptic belief systems. Often this form of knowledge can be equated with an anxious fear about the nature of OTHERNESS. As later examples show, contemporary apocalypticism frequently mixes with conspiratorial thought to produce events such as the Waco massacre and the Heaven's Gate suicides. In these instances apocalypticism tends to overlap millenarian thought. In the latter, the idea of the absolute end of the world is replaced by the notion of a relative apocalyptic that will result in the rebirth of a better social order. Thus the tension between UTOPIA/DYSTOPIA is implicit in apocalyptic discourse. Some examples, such as the image of the nuclear apocalypse, tend to stress the idea of absolute dystopic destruction, while others, such as the Calvinist world-view discussed by Max Weber, reflect the concept of the relative apocalypse, i.e., the dystopic death of a rotten social order and rebirth of a new ‘just’ utopian world.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article focuses on the two largest segments of Indonesian apocalypticism: the populist and the salafi-jihadi.
Kurzweil's notion of the Singularity (which entails human merging with advanced A.I.) is sometimes disparagingly referred to as the "rapture for the nerds." Certainly, there has been much written about religion and transhumanism, which also embraces the notion of the "Singularity." (20) Robert Geraci argues that many of the founders and luminaries in the development of artificial intelligence have been influenced by secularized forms of Christian and Jewish apocalypticism which he calls "apocalyptic A.I." (21) I will return to consider Geraci's thought later in this essay, but the discussion regarding the dangers and promises of superintelligence have largely ignored religious considerations.
Early General Baptist Apocalypticism and Eschatological Influences
Studies of both ancient and modern communities reflect a variety of sociological factors behind apocalypticism. This was probably seen most notably in the numerous studies of Pacific Islander "cargo cults," a problematic name, (9) that began in the late 1950s.
Growing out of a profound discontent with the status quo and seeing society and those in control as evil and antagonistic, apocalypticism promises that the first will be last and the last first.
Along the way, he introduces us to the Puritan progenitors of apocalypticism and to a competing religious narrative of the American founding based not on the New Testament's Book of Revelation, but on the Hebrew Bible's Exodus narrative.
Goertz insists, as he did in the 1989 book, that Muntzer's mysticism was an "apocalyptic mysticism." There is a scholarly consensus, following Bernhard McGinn, that the category "apocalypticism" applies to religious figures who stress God's direction of history from Creation to the Last Days.
If anything, the faith's doctrinal apocalypticism seems uniquely resonant with the howling dissatisfaction and rhetorical pessimism that so far has characterized the remarkable 2016 presidential campaign.
"Shia apocalypticism and Sunni apocalypticism are similar.
Fuller begins with a history of the human body as framed by evolutionary biology, then works his way through American religious history, focusing on occurrences such as revivals and apocalypticism. Fie interprets selected events in terms of such factors as the emotions of fear, guilt, shame, and wonder; pain; sexual passion; and genetic variations in personality traits.