apocalypticism


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Related to apocalypticism: eschatology, Sanhedrin, Parousia, Gentiles

apocalypticism

discourse that refers to theological and secular theories of the end of the world. Beyond its origins in biblical scripture, apocalyptic thought is often related to significant dates or moments of great historical change. The years 999 and 1999 both saw an increase in theories surrounding the prophesied end of the world. At times of profound historical change groups like the Diggers, Levellers, and Luddites have all informed and reflected apocalyptic belief systems. Often this form of knowledge can be equated with an anxious fear about the nature of OTHERNESS. As later examples show, contemporary apocalypticism frequently mixes with conspiratorial thought to produce events such as the Waco massacre and the Heaven's Gate suicides. In these instances apocalypticism tends to overlap millenarian thought. In the latter, the idea of the absolute end of the world is replaced by the notion of a relative apocalyptic that will result in the rebirth of a better social order. Thus the tension between UTOPIA/DYSTOPIA is implicit in apocalyptic discourse. Some examples, such as the image of the nuclear apocalypse, tend to stress the idea of absolute dystopic destruction, while others, such as the Calvinist world-view discussed by Max Weber, reflect the concept of the relative apocalypse, i.e., the dystopic death of a rotten social order and rebirth of a new ‘just’ utopian world.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixteenth-Century Apocalypticism, Millenarianism and the English Reformation: From John Bale to John Foxe and Thomas Brightman, Courtenay Library of Reformation Classics, vol.
Boyer, "The Growth of Fundamentalist Apocalypticism in the United States," ibid.
Now comes a brilliant three-volume Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism (Continuum, 1998) to flesh out the many examples of Jewish, and, even more complex, Christian eschatology.
Muntzer and Apocalypticism," Archiv fur Reformationsgeschichte 95 (2004), 98-131.
Scholars often trace the origin of apocalypticism to prophecy, because both genres use eschatology.
May's Toward a New Earth: Apocalypse in the American Novel (1972), William Wagar's Terminal Visions: The Literature of Last Things (1982), and Douglas Robinson's "Literature and Apocalypse" in the three-volume Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism, edited by John Collins, Bernard McGinn, and Stephen J.
This book offers the reader a tour of one of the more peculiar comers of medieval thought, a corner defined by the intersection of three enterprises: Spiritual Franciscanism, Joachite apocalypticism, and alchemical speculation.
s views that the earliest core of Q presents an unfiltered Jesus (66), and that Jesus' original message was progressively subverted or silenced through overlays of apocalypticism (within Q itself), Pauline Christianity, and then creedal Christianity (76-80).
An excellent example of this treatment is Thompson's impressive handling of apocalypticism in the New Testament.
Moltmann's eschatology is not historicized or transcendental or apocalypticism because they neglect hope.
He identifies the central issue and unifying principle in that "one-of-a-kind religious epic" ("epopee religieuse unique en son genre," [157]); he provides a context within which to trace the evolution toward increased apocalypticism among French and Genevan Reformed writers over the course of the sixteenth century, and he motivates his examination of the biblical passages on which d'Aubigne and others based their understanding of God's action in the world.
But apocalypticism as a phenomenon is more widespread than