apocalypticism


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Related to apocalypticism: eschatology, Sanhedrin, Parousia, Gentiles

apocalypticism

discourse that refers to theological and secular theories of the end of the world. Beyond its origins in biblical scripture, apocalyptic thought is often related to significant dates or moments of great historical change. The years 999 and 1999 both saw an increase in theories surrounding the prophesied end of the world. At times of profound historical change groups like the Diggers, Levellers, and Luddites have all informed and reflected apocalyptic belief systems. Often this form of knowledge can be equated with an anxious fear about the nature of OTHERNESS. As later examples show, contemporary apocalypticism frequently mixes with conspiratorial thought to produce events such as the Waco massacre and the Heaven's Gate suicides. In these instances apocalypticism tends to overlap millenarian thought. In the latter, the idea of the absolute end of the world is replaced by the notion of a relative apocalyptic that will result in the rebirth of a better social order. Thus the tension between UTOPIA/DYSTOPIA is implicit in apocalyptic discourse. Some examples, such as the image of the nuclear apocalypse, tend to stress the idea of absolute dystopic destruction, while others, such as the Calvinist world-view discussed by Max Weber, reflect the concept of the relative apocalypse, i.e., the dystopic death of a rotten social order and rebirth of a new ‘just’ utopian world.
References in periodicals archive ?
If his biblically based apocalypticism was just an excuse to stockpile arms, then Christianity remained a benign influence.
Although the macro-narrative themes and schema of Zoroastrian apocalypticism are quite ancient, (32) the date of Jamasp-nama itself is quite elusive.
Where Donahue's apocalypticism is dazzling, literary, and esoteric, Rehm's is sober and melancholic, expressing the anxieties of the Gospels themselves or the urgencies of Paul's letters with their sense that "the form of this world is passing away" (1 Corinthians 7:31):
Is apocalypticism a potential choice, or trap, for all Christians?
Judaism of the Second Temple Period, Volume 1: Qumran and Apocalypticism.
Covering the origins of apocalypticism from Hebrew prophecy through antiquity and early Christianity to its medieval revival in Joachim of Fiore, Taubes reveals its later secularized forms in Kant, Hegel, Marx, and Kierkegaard.
If incarnation, cross, and resurrection are allowed to modulate the symbol of the Second Coming, Christians may tap into the hope engendered by apocalypticism while avoiding the dangers of denigrating creation, demonizing the other, and ending in despair.
Indeed, particular years or particular occasions could be important triggers for astrological reflection, as Sabine Schmolensky points out in her account of Johannes Wolff's Lectiones memorabiles, typical of a climate of nervous apocalypticism at the century's turn in 1600.
html [last accessed 12/01/03] and "Modern Thought and Apocalypticism," in The Encyclopedia of Apocalypticism, volume 3 (New York: Continuum, 1998), 325-359.
According to Paul Christianson and a number of other historians writing around the same time, such as Tai Liu, William Lamont, Katherine Firth, and Richard Bauckham, apocalypticism existed from the earliest days of reformation in England and millenarianism was gaining respectability in the early years of the seventeenth century.
Apocalypticism is an enduring way of interpreting the world because it fulfills certain important religious and psychological needs.
Since at least 1967, the Israeli government, and the Likud Party in particular, have encouraged the broader movement of Christian fundamentalist apocalypticism.