apology

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apology

[Gr.,=defense], literary work that defends, justifies, or clarifies an author's ideas or point of view. Unlike the ordinary use of the word, the literary use neither implies that wrong has been done nor expresses regret. The most famous ancient example, Plato's Apology (3d cent. B.C.), presents Socrates' defense of himself at his trial before the Athenian government. Sir Philip Sidney's Apologie for Poetrie and Defense of Poesie (both: 1580), which examine the art of poetry and its condition in England, apparently were written to justify the poets' craft after it had been attacked by critics. A third famous example, Cardinal Newman's spiritual autobiography Apologia pro Vita sua (1864), was written to clarify the Cardinal's views after they had been misrepresented in an essay by Charles Kingsley.

Apology

(dreams)
This dream always has something to say about our relationships, the relationship that we have with ourselves and/or with others. Apologies are associated with forgiveness and honesty. Thus, consider the details of your dream and consider whether an apology is necessary in order for you to move forward in a particular relationship or with an area of your personal life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question that poses itself here is: Will we witness new and brave instances of apologies this year?
As apologies come they also invite comparison, and two recent high-profile apologies highlight differences between East and West: On the cusp of the New Year, Japan's hawkish Prime Minister Shinzo Abe issued a surprising, yet highly specific apology for sex slavery in Korea before and during World War II.
The Bill a Members Bill introduced by Margaret Mitchell, MSP is aimed at promoting a social and cultural change in attitudes to the giving of apologies.
Now public apologies are becoming the norm in our society--more about that later--but let's get real: Lawyers never say "I'm sorry.
The use of apologies as evidence of liability is a recurring issue in medical malpractice litigation.
If extorting apologies were an interstate crime, the FBI's hands would be full fighting the crime wave spawned by the apology mafia.
But we don't want to hear flowery speeches and ambiguous apologies.
Looking at the primate's apology, along with other church apologies, reasonable questions are being asked about how fully and completely responsibility has since been owned by participating organizations.
Compulsory apologies mostly train children to say things they don't mean--that is, to lie.
People and institutions routinely demand, and often receive, apologies, whether they are meant or not.
Apologies, even sincere ones, do not always have their intended effects.