apophysis

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Related to apophyseal: apophyseal fracture

apophysis

[ə′päf·ə·səs]
(anatomy)
An outgrowth or process on an organ or bone.
(mycology)
A swollen filament in fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Partial facetectomy may be performed in patients with traumatic lumbosacral dislocationtofacilitatereduction[34, 46, 70, 85, 99], although intact apophyseal joints are preferred to prevent redislocation [34].
Robinson, "Efficacy of a C1-C2 self sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) in the management of cervicogenic headache," Journal of Orthopaedic Sports Physical Therapy, vol.
There are several studies that have proved the effectiveness of cervical traction in patients with nerve root compression by alleviating pressure on nerve root as well as on the soft tissues.13,14 Cervical traction can be applied in ether supine position8,15,9 or by placing a patient in a halo vest in sitting position.10,11 The mode of cervical traction can be either continuous or intermittent.12 Maximum distraction of apophyseal joints depends on the combination of multiple factors including traction force, time and angle of cervical traction.
It includes an array of innovative interbody fusion devices engineered for easier insertion, reduced subsidence through maximum contact with the apophyseal ring, a generous bone grafting area and compatibility with the InFill graft delivery system.
(i) Calcification and ossification along the anterior surface of four contiguous vertebrae (ii) Preserved intervertebral disc height (iii) Absence of apophyseal joint ankylosis and sacroiliac joint sclerosis, erosion, or intraarticular bony effusion
This process may occur as osteoarthrosis at the synovial (apophyseal) facet joints and degenerative disc disease (DDD), or vertebral osteophytosis, at the (symphyseal) intervertebral joint.
joint restrictions with localized tenderness on palpation of the facet or apophyseal joints of the neck with no distal radiation) (See Table 3).
The most widely used diagnostic criteria were proposed by Resnick and Niwayama in the 1970s, including calcification and ossification along the anterolateral aspect of at least four contiguous vertebral bodies, preservation of intervertebral disc height at the involved segments, and absence of apophyseal joint ankylosis and sacroiliac inflammatory changes.[sup][3] The patient in this case report was diagnosed to be DISH because anterior osteophytes from C3 to C6 were representative and intervertebral disc height was relatively preserved, and there were no extraspinal manifestations.
(2) The growth of syndesmophytes along the vertebral column in these patients, fusion of the apophyseal joints and ossification of the spinal ligaments are causes of restricted spinal mobility.
LM is inhibited because of pain arising from apophyseal joints or intervertebral discs and can be involved in a negative circuit that perpetuates a self-inhibition (2).