apparent position

apparent position

[ə′pa·rənt pə′sish·ən]
(astronomy)
The position on the celestial sphere at which a heavenly body (or a space vehicle) would be seen from the center of the earth at a particular time. Also known as apparent place.
References in classic literature ?
There are thousands of such curt, strenuous ladies in the offices of London, but the interest of these lay rather in their real than their apparent position.
We also share the disappointment by many, including trade unionists, Labour supporters and some leading Labour Party politicians with the apparent position of the Greater Manchester Mayor, Andy Burnham.
from the cementoenamel junction to the probable depth of the pocket and apparent position is the level of crest of the gingival margin, i.e.
The ultimate objective of this entire planning was 'The desired results from the execution of this plan would be to place the United States in the apparent position of suffering defensible grievances from a rash and irresponsible government of Cuba and to develop an international image of a Cuban threat to peace in the Western Hemisphere.' US Joint Chiefs of Staff though authorized this plan, but President John F Kennedy rejected it.
In fact, India is in no apparent position to launch any significant military offensive against Pakistan as there exists a perfect balance of power between the two countries vis-a-vis both nuclear as well as conventional military fields.
The main effect is the change in the star's apparent position on the sky because the deviation shifts the centre of light relative to other more distant stars.
Their apparent position had moved because the sun's gravity had distorted the path of their starlight, just as Einstein had predicted.
As such, an extra 24 hours builds up every four years, meaning that an extra calendar day has to be added to align the calendar with the sun's apparent position.
As such, an extra 24 hours builds up every four years, meaning that an extra calendar day be added to align the calendar with the sun's apparent position.
The phenomenon of parallax, or slight shifts in apparent position depending on viewpoint, is particularly explicated with its relevance to star measurement.
The system uses a technique called pixel-level dense image correspondence to stabilize video; compress background; eliminate slight differences in the apparent position of objects viewed from different cameras; and provide superb subpixel resolution of moving objects of interest.
The team led by astronomer Adam Deller did this by observing the object over a two-year period to detect its parallax, the slight shift in apparent position against background objects when viewed from opposite ends of Earth's orbit around the Sun.