apparent source

apparent source

[ə′pa·rənt ′sȯrs]
(engineering acoustics)
References in classic literature ?
Their way led directly towards the apparent source of the river at the base of the cliffs, and as I neared this point I found the meadow dotted with huge boulders that the ravages of time had evidently dislodged from the towering crags above.
For example, the period since the 2016 election has seen a sharp increase in trade policy concerns as an apparent source of market volatility.
Furthermore, bank officials are instructed to report heavy transactions and suspicious amounts deposited/withdrawn in accounts that do not commensurate with the apparent source of income of the account holder, especially if it is a new account.
That would cause the apparent source to deviate considerably from the real source when the orbit is calculated back.
Out of the 120 brainstems studied, it was found that in all of them, namely 100% of the neuro-anatomical pieces, corresponding to 240 retro-olivary grooves, the apparent source of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and accessory nerves, form a continuous line of nerve fibers that emerges from the medulla oblongata, oriented from top to bottom.
A TRAIL of unexplained children's footprints covering the floor and the jingle jangling sounds made by a set of keys but with no apparent source.
And the apparent source of the allegation distanced himself from the claim that the Treasury was attempting to influence policy in favour of staying in the customs union.
To determine how often they occur, the scientists based their calculations, for a study in the (http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa8905/meta;jsessionid=A838CD17673B4A05D3463F08ECEE6A96.ip-10-40-2-120) Astrophysical Journal Letters , on how fast radio bursts have been detected and their apparent source in the night sky.
They included his perpetual motion machine, which takes the form of a bike wheel that has spun endlessly with no apparent source of energy.
Clough's apparent source was not a French novel but the short story of a French novelist, Arsene Houssaye--more specifically, the story as first published in a French literary journal a decade before Clough began work on Amours de voyage and two decades before Houssaye's revisions of the tale for book publication eliminated nearly all of the text on which Clough's epigraph appears to have been based.
While Daigle-Williamson does indeed analyze in many instances, in too many others she substantiates the apparent source connection and moves on without sufficiently discussing its implications.