appendicular skeleton


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appendicular skeleton

[‚ap·ən′dik·yə·lər ′skel·ə·tən]
(anatomy)
The bones of the pectoral and pelvic girdles and the paired appendages in vertebrates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The highest sensitivity for fracture detection (26 of 29, 89.7%) was achieved when experienced radiographers reported fractures of the appendicular skeleton in adults.
Most other studies detail bone loss at the appendicular skeleton using Single Photon Absorptiometry (SPA) and Dual Photon Absorptiometry (DPA) and so are not directly comparable.
The current study was planned to observe the axial as well as appendicular skeleton of BMD by DEXA method in RA patients.
Whole-body bone scintigraphy following administration of 19.63 mCi Tc-99m HDP showed multiple lobulated and expansile areas of intense radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the axial and appendicular skeleton, more pronounced in the latter, particularly in the lower extremities and the proximal humeri assuming the appearance of round rubber rings as in the "Michelin Man" (Figure 4A,B).
(1) The most common site of involvement is the dorsal paraspinal region with a progression from the axial to the appendicular skeleton. It is a rare disease with a prevalence of 1 in 2000000 people with no racial or geographical preponderance.
(8) Affected patients usually become dependent and confined to wheel-chair or bed at the second decade of their life as a result of ankylosing of all major joints of both axial and appendicular skeleton. (2) However, many patients survived till the age of 60 and beyond.
In other species, such as dogs, it can be found most frequently in the metaphyseal region of the appendicular skeleton but has also been reported in ribs, vertebrae, bones of the head, and rarely, in soft tissues.
Focal-Film Distance = 48 inches[5] X-ray Film: structured grain format distal limbs: 25-100 speed Bucky studies: 400-600 speed Focal Spots: distal limbs: 0.6 mm appendicular skeleton: 0.6 mm skull: 0.6 mm trunk: 1.2 mm As we enter the 21st century, radiographers look forward to digital imaging in radiography.
The involvement of distal appendicular skeleton at presentation is very rare.
Though the most common site of occurrence is around the knee joint, it can involve any part of appendicular skeleton. Other rarer sites of involvement include the head and neck region and the chest wall.