appetitive behavior


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appetitive behavior

[ə′ped·ə·tiv bi′hāv·yər]
(zoology)
Any behavior that increases the probability that an animal will be able to satisfy a need; for example, a hungry animal will move around to find food.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Feeding is a complicated behavior involving food ingestion and appetitive behavior, which reflects the motivation for food intake (Keen-Rhinehart et al., 2013; Simpson and Balsam, 2016).
The link between testosterone and depression has been debated extensively because testosterone is a neuroactive steroid hormone known to influence mood and appetitive behavior, Dr.
Associative memory in appetitive behavior: Framework and relevance to epidemiology and prevention.
Robbins, "Appetitive behavior: impact of amygdala-dependent mechanisms of emotional learning," Annals of the new York Academy of Sciences, vol.
The BAS is activated by discriminative stimuli principally associated with positive and negative reinforcements both connected with positive and agreeable situations and events able to regulate appetitive behavior and fight or flight reactions.
The largest part of the book discusses dynamic treatment approaches to psychiatric disorders as described in the DSM-5, including schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, disorders of sexual and appetitive behavior, neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive issues, and personality disorders.
Food initiates appetitive behavior, which generally includes orientation and locomotion towards it.
The basis of superstitious behavior: Chance eontingency, stimulus substitution, or appetitive behavior? Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 44, 279-299.
We here hypothesize that in Lymnaea after the establishment of CTA with 50 or more pairings of the CS-US, the CS (sucrose) would elicit a fear response rather than an appetitive behavior (biting).
The basis of superstitious behavior: Chance contingency, stimulus substitution, or appetitive behavior? Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 44, 279-299.
Appetitive behavior can become problematic, particularly if carried out in excess or if harmful or maladaptive consequences are probable.