apposition eye

apposition eye

[‚ap·ə′zish·ən ‚ī]
(invertebrate zoology)
A compound eye found in diurnal insects and crustaceans in which each ommatidium focuses on a small part of the whole field of light, producing a mosaic image.
References in periodicals archive ?
Animals that possess superposition eyes live in dim environments or are active at night; whereas those with apposition eyes live in bright environments and are active during the day.
comm., and Juberthie-Jupeau, 1972; Alvinocaris markensis: Chamberlain, 2000); or in which juvenile individuals feature apposition eyes, but adults have superposition eyes (e.g., Panulirus longipes: Meyer-Rochow, 1975; mysids and euphausiids: Nilsson et al., 1986); or in which the dioptric elements are lost and the retina changes from the imaging type to a nonimaging one (bresiliid shrimps: Gaten et al., 1998).
The eggs are microlecithal, and they hatch at the zoeal stage with apposition eyes (P.
It is generally assumed that superposition eyes are more useful than apposition eyes in dim light, for the former are typical of many nocturnal crustaceans and deep-sea forms.