approach-avoidance conflict


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approach-avoidance conflict

[ə¦prōch ə¦vȯid·əns ¦kän‚flikt]
(psychology)
Psychological conflict that results when a goal has both desirable and undesirable aspects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Graybiel and colleagues focused on a type of decision-making process known as approach-avoidance conflict. Approach-avoidance conflict describes situations in which people (or mammals) have to decide between two options by weighing the positive and negative aspects of each alternative.
They wanted to see what role two further subareas of the ventral hippocampus -- called the CA1 and CA3 -- play in terms of approach-avoidance conflict processing.
Displacement: Greater Generalization of Approach Than Avoidance in a Generalized Approach-Avoidance Conflict. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 43 (3), 217-221.
This may be viewed as compromising the claim that an approach-avoidance conflict was experienced by any individual participant.
This desire of a respectable survival in the society and the disliking for someone, with whom relationship cannot be terminated, seems to be governed by an approach-avoidance conflict.
The simultaneous activation of the BAS and FFFS result in an approach-avoidance conflict, whereby approach and avoidance tendencies are both inhibited by the BIS.
Both Astin (1962) and Heilizer (1964) suggested that for problem drinkers, alcohol-associated cues induce an approach-avoidance conflict. According to both Astin's and Heilizer's models, conflict arises in alcoholics because previous alcohol use has been both reinforced and punished.
Miller: Selected Papers (Aldine Transaction), Miller presents 64 theoretical and experimental analyses of topics including approach-avoidance conflicts; the physiological basis of motivation, displacement, and the learning of drives; and conditioning of autonomic nervous system responses.