approximate

(redirected from approximative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

approximate

[ə′präk·sə·mət (adjective) or ə′präk·sə‚māt (verb)]
(mathematics)
To obtain a result that is not exact but is near enough to the correct result for some specified purpose.
To obtain a series of results approaching the correct result.
(science and technology)
Close to the correct value. Abbreviated approx.
To be close to.
References in periodicals archive ?
An approximative case with the marker -lan exists both in the Beserman dialect and, at least according to grammars, in literary Udmurt (see more on that in 3.3).
A point [x.sub.0] [member of] D(T) is said to be the best approximative solution to the operator equation Tx = y, if
It can be considered as a new and general approach to the convergence problems of the approximative solutions.
In the sentences used by female executors, the approximative adjectives are used in 15 cases, which are summarized in Table (5).
Speed (Gbits/s) PRBG -O0 -O1 Proposed 2.62 80.00 Patidar's 0.06 1.18 Table 5: The approximative throughput in Gbits/s for MTGP11213 (Mersenne Twister for Graphic Processor) and CURAND (NVIDIA CUDA Random Number Generation library).
In the phase rotation process, approximative rotational iterative formula is
Add to this the errors committed when using approximative numerical methods in the programming process (e.g., the trapezes method used for computing the integral in the above formula).
Of course, on describing dynamical behaviors of water waves, (4) is only a rough approximative model of (1) compared with (5); that is, the precision of model (5) is better than that of model (4) on describing dynamical behaviors of water waves.
Nevertheless, using LPV control methodology needs to transform the nonlinear system to the LPV system, there is no uniform evaluation criterion to judging the approximative transform.
Scanning electron micrograph was performed to characterize the approximative grain sizes and surface morphologies of the Li[Ni.sub.0.7-x][Mg.sub.x][Co.sub.0.3][O.sub.2] (0 [less than or equal to] x [less than or equal to] 0.1).
Spahn situates her subject in a dualistic Newtonian world of eternal or absolute time on one hand and an approximative time of human perception on the other, which, she says, helped create a "mentality that was philosophically bent on compromise" (4).