APT

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APT

(computer science)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

APT

1. On drawings; abbr. for apartment.
2. Abbr. for Association for Preservation Technology.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

APT

(language)

APT

(company)
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

APT

(1) See advanced persistent threat.

(2) (Automatic Programmed Tools) A high-level programming language used to generate instructions for numerical control machines.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Consumers will find adding their financial management apps here to be the aptest use of the Secure Folder.
(135) Ultimately, "[b]ecause common words typically have more than one meaning, you must use the context in which a given word appears to determine its aptest, most likely sense." (136) The COCA conveniently provides a tool for this very purpose, called the Keyword-in-Context or "KWIC." (137)
380, 405 (1991) (Scalia, J., dissenting) (contending that the task of the judge is to read "the words of [a statutory] text as any ordinary Member of Congress would have read them and apply the meaning so determined" (citation omitted)); Scalia & Garner, supra note 63, at 418 ("Because common words typically have more than one meaning, you must use the context in which a given word appears to determine its aptest, most likely sense.").
65-6, no original: "The right of Nature," which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything, which in his own judgment and reason he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto".
Bishop Godfrey Goodman, writing in 1650 about events he had witnessed in Elizabeth's court, also reports the existence of special mirrors: After an account of the elderly Queen's unattractive "goggle throat," Goodman concludes "And truly, there was then a report that the ladies had gotten false looking-glasses, that the Queen might not see her own wrinkles; for having been exceeding beautiful and fair in her youth, such beauties are ever aptest for wrinkles in old age" (164).
"Writers should use metaphors sparingly, should wait for the aptest moments, elsewhere using a more straightforward style." (22) When it is the moment, "[k]now your audience and the parameters of good taste." (23)
(4) "The RIGHT OF NATURE, which Writers commonly call Jus Naturale, is the Liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own Nature; that is to say, of his own Life; and consequently, of doing any thing, which in his own Judgement, and Reasons, he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto" (Hobbes, Leviathan, Ch.