APT

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APT

(computer science)

APT

1. On drawings; abbr. for apartment.
2. Abbr. for Association for Preservation Technology.

APT

(language)

APT

(company)

APT

(1) See advanced persistent threat.

(2) (Automatic Programmed Tools) A high-level programming language used to generate instructions for numerical control machines.
References in periodicals archive ?
These folks are aptly referred to as "Very Important Patriots."
Earning an MFA in poetry from Vermont College and named 1990 Poet Laureate of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, as well as winner of the First Prize in Water-Stone's 1999 Jane Kenyon Poetry Contest, Goldfinch And Memory, is the debut publication of Mary Coolidge Costs poetry and will aptly serve to bring her impressive work to the attention of a national readership.
Three different grade levels are aptly served by Thomson's fine biographical sketches.
Those who are convinced that our schools require fundamental reform, Howell aptly concludes, had best look beyond the boardroom.
Two excellent 'Listen and Learn' CD packages from Dover Publications aptly pair an indexed manual with all words and phrases on the cd with two CDs packing in over 700 useful phrases in English and the language presented.
The aptly named album Baptism harkens back to his early days.
In their letter, the bishops denounced "the horrifying amount of arms which feed conflicts in the Great Lakes Region," and suggested the war could aptly be called "the first African world war because it involves not only nine different African countries and their Western supporters, but also because the war affects the vital interests of the entire continent."
Nadine Thomas (D-Decatur) aptly describes it ought to consider the fate of Ethiopian Emperor Menelik II.
CLAIM TO FAME Drake and his co-star Josh Peck from The Amanda Show on Nick, now have their own show, aptly named, The Drake and Josh Show (it airs 7:30 p.m.
Oberlin College's dance department was aptly described by your magazine.
The scriptural references and biblical examples are well chosen and aptly complement the book's themes.
CSPI has, Sullum notes, "the ability to grab headlines, kill sales of products it doesn't like, and shape regulatory policy." Yet Sullum shows that CSPI, far from being a source of thoughtful, responsible research, represents yet another variation on the grand old impulse toward puritanism, aptly defined by H.L.