arborization

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arborization

[‚är·bə·rə′zā·shən]
(biology)
A treelike arrangement, such as a branched dendrite or axon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several important brain maturational events that continue into early adulthood, such as synaptic pruning, elaboration of dendritic arborization, and increased myelination [7] that could impact cortical connectivity.
Trudeau, "Elevated mitochondrial bioenergetics and axonal arborization size are key contributors to the vulnerability of dopamine neurons," Current Biology, vol.
2003), we examined dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as one primary brain region implicated in learning and memory (Squire 1992).
In the same line, a recent study by our group using the Golgi-Cox-Sholl technique (Fernandez et al., 1997) shows that environmental enrichment, during the critical period of development, induces a significant increment of dendritic arborizations in the pyramidals neurons of layer V in the visual cortex.
Axon arborizations were rarely observed in the pyramidal cell layer.
By studying synaptogenesis, Gelfo and coworkers evidenced as indices of improved neuronal circuitry the increased dendritic length and spine density shown by the frontal and parietal pyramidal neuron apical and basal arborizations of rats reared in EE [35].
5a), and are unbranched between their origins and their 'bush-like' terminal arborizations; however, several collaterals were observed to branch a few times before termination (Figs.
Rapid Golgi staining was used to visualize dendritic arborizations and spines, and routine Nissl staining was applied to visualize the somatic configuration of the PCs.
A cross-platform freeware tool for digital reconstruction of neuronal arborizations from image stacks.
It has been attributed to activation of existing, but weak connections, axonal outgrowth, dendritic arborizations, and synaptogenesis: phenomena that accompany functional restoration of neuronal networks [5, 10,12,13].
Recent intracellular recordings using electrodes filled with a tracer dye reveal that there are at least two types of photoreceptors, type A and type T, which have distinct responses to light and terminal arborizations (Sakakibara et al., 2005a).
Parallel fibers, which are one of the main sources of input to PCs, were described by Santiago Ramon y Cajal as lying perpendicular to PC dendritic arborizations. In addition to its regularity, the cerebellum is also highly foliated, giving rise to three distinct gross anatomical subdivisions: sulcus, apex, and bank [2-5].