arborol

arborol

[′är·bə‚rōl] dendrimer
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The third dendritic compound [DE.sub.3] was a 6-10-6 arborol, which was prepared as shown in Scheme (3) by the reaction of Iris with tetraester (T) (43).
Two other water-soluble dendritic architectures were prepared such as D[E.sub.2] (3-oxo-6-oxa-2-azaheptylidyne): (3-oxo-2- aza-pentylidyne): propionic acid which ends with COOH (42) and D[E.sub.3] (N,N',N',N"-tetrakis [2-hydroxy -1,1-bis(hydroxyl-methyl)ethyl]-[alpha],[alpha],[omega],[omega]-alkanetetracarboxamide or better a [6]-10-[6] Arborols) which ends with OH (43).
Synthesis of N,N',N',N'-Tetrakis[2-hydroxy-1,1--bis (hydroxylmethyl)ethyl]-[alpha],[alpha],[omega],[omega]-alkanetetracarboxamide [6]-10-[6] Arborols (D[E.sub.3]).
The highly branched polymers are either dendrimers or arborols. The words "dendrimer" (8) (coined by Tomalia) and "arborol" (9) (coined by Newkome) are derived from the Greek dendro (meaning tree-like) and the Latin arbor (meaning tree).
This molecule would be named [9]-6 arborol; the 9 refers to the number of hydroxyl groups and the 6 refers to the hydrophobic chain length.
Amphipathic arborols are capable of self-assembling into micelles.
Newkome, who is vice president for research at the university and who leads dendrimer efforts there, explained that his group has developed a type of dendrimer called an "arborol" or "cascade" molecule.
In the mid-1980s, Tomalia and others, including arborol maker George R.
Though many of their creations -- which go by such names as starburst dendrimers, arborols and hyperbranched macromolecules -- exhibit a brand of molecular beauty, these designers are driven by much more than aesthetics.
When Tomalia first published his work on dendrimers in 1984, Newkome and his colleagues were busily building giant molecules that they call arborols. Both chemists say their inspiration came largely from branching systems in nature, such as trees, ferns and circulatory systems.
But now his team also routinely builds dumbbell-shaped arborols, called sylvanols.
The name comes from the Greek word, which translates to "trees." Synonymous terms for dendrimers include arborols and cascade molecules.