archaism

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Related to archaisms: fopperies

archaism

an archaic word, expression, style, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
remarked with regard to the frequent use of archaisms in this work: "such olde and obsolete wordes are most used of country folke, sure I think, and think I think [sic] not amisse, that they bring great grace and, as one would say, auctoritie to the verse" (Greenlaw et al.
The idea of the day when a person was alive-and-dead is a standard Middle English locution, and I take it that Titus's use of it here is one of those characterizing archaisms.
Insofar as he limns antiquity it is not the hard-edged discipline of celestial geometry; but the deeper, darker, Dionysiac archaisms of an Arcadia where Eros and Thanatos are the closest of chums and where the spilling of blood and semen blossoms into Bacchic horticulture.
Lynch affirms that the lexicographer being compelled to record archaisms in his Dictionary, finds Spenser's Shepheardes Calender, simply identified as "Pastorals," an important source of providing obsolete and rustic words.
the use of archaisms or a woeful absence of punctuation) seems inexcusable.
Even the ghost of a form--however "shattered"--brings a transfiguring discipline to bear on Davis's excess, and her "sonnets," full of Hopkins's rhythms and Berryman's archaisms, are powerful, sometimes terrifying poems.
To summarize, exceptions fall into two general categories: archaisms and occasional neologisms based on foreign patterns.
While O'Hair delights in mocking Catholic archaisms, biblical literalism, and other easy targets, she's equally tough on modern liberal theologians such as Reinhold Niebuhr and Martin Buber, and skeptical of the notion that Americans left religious intolerance back in the Old Country.
These include archaisms as well as local and regional melodic features.
These include the replacement of "Happy Christmas" with "Merry Christmas;" the orthographic mutations of Moore's "Donder and Blitzen" to "Donner"/"Dunder," and "Blixem"/"Blixen;" some inserted archaisms ("spoke" to "spake," "jerk" to "jirk"); amplifications of diction ("dressed all in fur" to "trimmed up in fur"); and slight bowdlerisations ("settled our brains" to "settled down").
Such is his penchant for archaisms that Pausanias extends the style to his description of historical events, as in the Aristomenes episode (Paus.
He finds Apuleius's vocabulary 'highly exotic', being full of archaisms and colloquial diminutives, and he quotes Pater with approval: Apuleius is 'full of archaisms and felicities in which that generation delighted, quaint terms and images picked fresh from the early dramatists, the lifelike phrases of some lost poet preserved by an old grammarian, racy morsels of the vernacular and studied prettiness'.