architectural barrier


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architectural barrier

An architectural feature that creates inaccessibility or prevents the free movement of disabled people within a building.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2010 ADA Standards went into effect in March 2012, mandating the removal of architectural barriers. These standards prompted the wide-spread installation of pool lifts at hotels, among other huge changes.
The data gathered from the accessibility survey looked at architectural barrier removal issues, not at program accessibility issues.
Remember that in existing buildings, it is necessary only to remove architectural barriers if it is "readily achievable," that is, "cheap and easy."
People with disabilties face significant problems living here: lack of public transportation, architectural barriers, ice and snow, lack of industry, and isolation.
Title III of the ADA specifically requires the removal of structural or architectural barriers unless doing so creates an "undue hardship." Thus, any planned alterations or renovation must be checked against the ADA Accessibility Guidelines.
Sigelman, Vengroff, and Spanhel (1979), based partially on the work of Dudek and his associates (1977), proposed that rehabilitation technologies and practices can be grouped into four main categories: (1) physical interventions, including such procedures as prosthetics and surgery, (2) training and counseling which refers to educational and psychotherapeutic interventions, (3) environmental manipulation, encompassing removal of architectural barriers, adaptation of transportation systems, etc., and finally, (4) service delivery which appears to tap procedural practices such as rehabilitation planning, follow-up services, and so on.
As amended, HR 620 would remove any consequence for businesses with architectural barriers that violate the ADA unless and until a person with a disability provides a notice stating how the business has violated the law.
They manifest themselves mainly in form of architectural barriers that physically prevent disabled persons from being mobile.
Arona has developed the Integral Accessibility Scheme initiative, covering all types of facilities and services and eliminating architectural barriers in public walkways, public and private buildings, transport, telecommunications and leisure and tourism facilities.
Throughout the past 25 years, many discriminatory policies, practices and barriers have been removed for people with disabilities as a result of requirements mandated by the ADA and other related laws, such as the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which covers federal employees and applicants with disabilities.
It also reflects the Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines, and includes updates and additional information on topics like seismic detailing of ceiling systems and the Building Owners and Managers Association International standards for measuring space.
The issue of architectural barriers are very important for people with disabilities.

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