minute of arc

(redirected from arcsecond)
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minute of arc

(arc minute; arc min) See arc second.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Nathan Ramasarma, Co-founder and CEO of ArcSecond, Inc.
Each terrain parameter was produced at 1-arcsecond resolution and reduced to 3 arcseconds to serve the needs of the Soil and Landscape Grid of Australia, for compatibility with GlobalSoilMap specifications and to decrease data volume for easy distribution.
This shift results in an apparent angular displacement seen from the Earth of less than an arcsecond, of the order of accuracy of the position reconstructed with the software.
The 1100GTO comes with a guaranteed peak-to-peak periodic error of 7 arcseconds or better.
It can measure stellar sizes and resolve flares and starspots as small as 0.0002 arcsecond.
Newcomers quickly run into terms like "arcsecond," "4th magnitude," and "right ascension." But they're easy to learn.
Newcomers can get thrown by such arcane-sounding terms as "arcsecond," "4th magnitude," and "right ascension." But they're not as tough as they sound.
I'm going to measure the Sun's deflection of starlight too, and to succeed I'll need to determine star positions accurate to a small fraction of an arcsecond, during only 140 seconds of totality, with no second chance if something goes wrong.
Even at a good location, atmospheric turbulence smears out details smaller than 1 arcsecond across.
I was surprised to see not one but two other stars within 8 arcseconds of the central star with proper motions and parallax measurements essentially identical to that of the central star, within Gaia's measurement error.
GMx mounts can hold 12.5mm, 25mm and 50mm square optics of any thickness greater than 2mm, and offer up to 8[degrees] of total rotation in each axis, with a resolution as low as 3.2 arcseconds. All adjustments are accessed from the top of the mount to facilitate their use in space-constrained systems and instruments.
The planet's disc will exceed 45 arcseconds in diameter, so a telescope employing a magnification of just 40x will make it appear the same size as our Moon to the unaided eye.