arctic tree line

arctic tree line

[′ärd·ik ¦trē ‚līn]
(ecology)
The northern limit of tree growth; the sinuous boundary between tundra and boreal forest.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The study site is located in the riviere Boniface area (57 [degrees] 44[minute] N, 76 [degrees] 10 [minute] W), 40 km east of Hudson Bay and 10 km south of the arctic tree line in northern Quebec.
Landscape change following deforestation at the arctic tree line in Quebec.
Two years ago, Botkin began surveying North America's boreal forests -- the largely coniferous woodlands running from the Arctic tree line down through Canada and dipping into the northern United States.
The Arctic tree line is typically defined as the northern limit of the subarctic forest-tundra or tundra-taiga interface, the transitional zone between the closed-canopy continuous boreal forest to the south and the treeless Arctic tundra to the north (Hustich, 1953, 1979; Payette et al.
In particular, the arctic tree line and the nearby forest stands are typically cold-stressed ecosystems that are likely to experience pole-ward displacements in response to warming (Smith et al.
Late-Quaternary vegetation and climate near the arctic tree line of northwestern North America.
The Arctic tree line at the limit of the forest-tundra ecotone is an important biogeographical boundary for climate change investigations.
This ecotone extends from the continuous forest limit to the Arctic tree line, and trees at the northern end of this range are at the edge of their ecological amplitude (Danby and Hik, 2007).