arecoline


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arecoline

[ə′rek·ə‚lēn]
(organic chemistry)
C8H13O2N An alkaloid from the betel nut; an oily, colorless liquid with a boiling point of 209°C; soluble in water, ethanol, and ether; combustible; used as a medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prenatal exposure to arecoline (areca nut alkaloid) and birth outcomes.
In a normal tissue, collagen is degraded by phagocytosis whereas in OSMF, arecoline suppresses T cell activity which in turn decreases the cell mediated immunity resulting in decreased phagocytosis.
On the other hand, it has been reported that arecoline significantly attenuated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes insulin-induced uptake of glucose (Hsu et al.
9,10 Arecoline is the major alkaloid in areca nut is hydrolyzed to arecaidine in vivo, which is the main stimulator of human buccal mucosal fibro-blast.
It contains three major alkaloids: arecoline, pilocarpine, and muscarine.
Some studies have proved that arecoline in areca nut is the main causative agent and tannin which is a protein, can have synergistic role.
Betel nuts contain the alkaloid arecoline a mild stimulant that produces a feeling of well being.
It was also found that convolvine potentiates the effects of arecoline, a muscarinic memory enhancer that ameliorates cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (Asthana 1996, Mirzaev 1998).
Hypoglycemic activity of arecoline in betel nut Areca Catechu L.
In 15 settlements in which dog feces samplings were conducted in Yiniu and Xiazha townships, feces specimens were collected from dogs after purging with arecoline, according to the recommendations of World Animal Health Organization/World Health Organization (13), and droppings were collected from the ground when accessible (4).
Aloes, arecoline, and calomel are examples of laxatives, drastic purgatives, and cholagogue purgatives.