Arenaviridae

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Related to arenavirus: bunyavirus

Arenaviridae

[ə‚rēn·ə′vī·rə‚dē]
(virology)
A family of ribonucleic acid animal viruses consisting of a single genus, Arenavirus, having an enveloped, spherical pleomorphic form.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(2007) In vitro and in vivo activities of T-705 against arenavirus and bunyavirus infections.
This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Arenavirus Infection Lassa Fever, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.
Before 2008, Lassa virus was the only arenavirus known to cause HF in Africa.
Twenty-one individuals (7.2% of captured rodents) tested positive for hantavirus IgG antibodies, and nine individuals (3.1% of captured rodents) tested positive for arenavirus IgG antibodies.
Hasta el momento, y de acuerdo con los signos y sintomas que se refieren, se piensa en los agentes etiologicos de infecciones como peste, leptospirosis, malaria o bartonelosis, aunque mas probablemente se haya tratado de infecciones causadas por virus tales como el de fiebre amarilla, dengue, hantavirus o arenavirus (Acuna-Soto et al., 2004).
Effect of fatty acids on arenavirus replication: inhibition of virus production by lauric acid.
In the study by Matanic and Castilla (2004), the in vitro antiviral activity of antimicrobial cationic peptides cecropin A, melittin, magainin I and II, and indolicidin against the arenavirus Junin virus (JV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) was evaluated.
In 1933 lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) was the first arenavirus isolated during an investigation of an epidemic of St.
Further testing on tissue samples from the three patients confirmed a new type of arenavirus, a family of mainly rodent viruses that occasionally affect humans.
Three deaths in California have been linked to a virus in the genus Arenavirus. This rare virus has never before infected humans in North America.